American food – Were Cooking Restaurants USA http://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/ Tue, 10 May 2022 16:01:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg American food – Were Cooking Restaurants USA http://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/ 32 32 Delve into ‘the messy history of American cuisine’ https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/delve-into-the-messy-history-of-american-cuisine/ Tue, 10 May 2022 16:01:42 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/delve-into-the-messy-history-of-american-cuisine/ Decades old bread dough. Wars of the cola makers. Hypermasculine advertisements for cheeseburgers. The ways Americans make, market and consume our favorite foods have a complicated and fascinating history as old as our nation itself, and sometimes older. As connoisseurs of the weird and the wonderful when it comes to cooking, Thrillist has long been […]]]>

Decades old bread dough. Wars of the cola makers. Hypermasculine advertisements for cheeseburgers. The ways Americans make, market and consume our favorite foods have a complicated and fascinating history as old as our nation itself, and sometimes older. As connoisseurs of the weird and the wonderful when it comes to cooking, Thrillist has long been fascinated by all aspects of what makes our lives delicious. The new series produced by Thrillist Messy History of American Foodto discover+ on May 11, is an examination and celebration of the origins of everything from bread to cereal to chocolate, and nothing is out of place.

You might not realize exactly how much history lives inside the bagel you get at your convenience store every morning, or the can of Coke you surreptitiously open when you need a caffeine hit. the afternoon. With episodes focusing on foods as innocuous and broad as “Bread” and “Burgers,” Messy History of American Food delves into the extraordinary detail of the things we eat every day — or, in the case of “Wings,” the things without which no Super Bowl party is complete. Did you know there is a bakery in San Francisco that uses a sourdough starter from the 1800s? Or that Coca-Cola wasn’t the only soft drink mixed with, uh, suspicious substances? The show presents these facts with a combination of archival footage intercut with interviews with chocolatiers, soda lovers, and Thrillist’s own food experts to give you insight into all the messy details.

click to play the video

But, because the show is committed to honesty, it’s not all fun and games. Messy history is careful not to obscure darker details, such as the origins of Native American fry bread, which was originally baked with extremely unhealthy ingredients given to them after European settlers moved their tribes to reservations and annexed their hunting grounds. There’s really no way to explore the whole story of something as multifaceted as the food we eat without facing the reality of why it’s the way it is, and this willingness not to shy away from these stories makes it a much richer experience.

There’s an unmistakable – and timely – theme that runs through many episodes of the series: primarily how much of the food we take for granted as everyday parts of our own lives are the products of immigrants. Most of the things we think of as purely “American” aren’t at all. Polish Jews brought bagels to New York. Korean restaurants have created their own version of chicken wings. The sourdough came from Mexicans who traveled to California for the gold rush. Everything we own comes from elsewhere and carries with it the value of many generations of social complexities and innovations.

Messy History of American Food brings all of this to the fore and more and, with its half-hour episodes, gives a lighthearted but in-depth investigation into the subjects of each of its episodes. You’ll learn why Hershey’s chocolate tastes that way, why “sliced ​​bread” was such an earth-shattering invention, and why exactly so many burger chains decided the best way to market their product was to film models eating them while washing their hands. cars. That bowl of cereal you have every morning? You’ll never look at it the same way again.

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Emma Stefansky is an entertainment editor at Thrillist. Follow her on Twitter @stefabsky.

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3 Little Pigs Chi Cooks Superb Chinese-American Food To Satisfy Your Inner Empress – Chicago Tribune https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/3-little-pigs-chi-cooks-superb-chinese-american-food-to-satisfy-your-inner-empress-chicago-tribune/ Mon, 09 May 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/3-little-pigs-chi-cooks-superb-chinese-american-food-to-satisfy-your-inner-empress-chicago-tribune/ Chinese-American cuisine is such a big part of Chicago culture that we have not one, but two schools of Chicago-style spring rolls. There are the old-fashioned peanut butter egg rolls, handmade at chop suey restaurants, and the new-school egg rolls, often filled with jerk chicken. The latter, created by black-owned businesses on the south and […]]]>

Chinese-American cuisine is such a big part of Chicago culture that we have not one, but two schools of Chicago-style spring rolls.

There are the old-fashioned peanut butter egg rolls, handmade at chop suey restaurants, and the new-school egg rolls, often filled with jerk chicken. The latter, created by black-owned businesses on the south and west sides, transcend the cultural, if not geographic, segregation of the city.

Then there are spring rolls by Henry Cai, chef and owner of 3 Little Pigs Chi in Humboldt Park. I have yet to taste them. That’s the nature of many new virtual restaurants that have opened during the pandemic. Fan favorites come and go, but some still sell out for over two years, avoiding even the most nosy reviews.

Cai cooks what he calls non-traditionally authentic Chinese-American cuisine at 3 Little Pigs, one of the few restaurants to do so in Chicago. Chef Stephanie Izard similarly describes Duck Duck Goat as reasonably authentic Chinese cuisine, but offers her version of regional dishes, such as the lovely xiaolongbao stuffed with duck and goat cheese. Chef Jason Vincent taps into American Chinese nostalgia at Chef’s Special Cocktail Bar, but his menu leans more Chinese than American with fiery red mapo tofu.

A beautiful 3LP fried rice, plus a playful salt and pepper fried chicken sandwich, make 3 Little Pigs a serious destination for deeply personal and very delicious dishes translated with the rare ease of a Chinatown kid.

Cai originally launched his virtual business on Instagram in February 2020. A year later, 3 Little Pigs was nominated for our Readers’ Choice Award for Best Virtual Restaurant in March 2021. He found a home at Humboldt Park Eatery, a shared kitchen, in November. .

His fried chicken sandwich alone shows a mastery of many worlds. A golden, crackling, delicately spiced crust holds a tender, juicy leg that’s golden brown again with a brilliant, honey-nut shrimp-inspired sauce.

“I love jiu yim gai (salt and pepper chicken),” said Cai, who was born in Chicago and raised in Cantonese, with a southern accent. Salt and pepper is not just salt and pepper, but the Chinese seasoning which is traditionally fine salt, white pepper, hot five-spice powder, and sometimes other ingredients. “So I put all the ingredients that go into a jiu yim gai in my sandwich. I use the fried garlic. I use the jalapenos.

And then there is his love for that exotic sauce, mayonnaise.

“My high school lunch wasn’t great,” said Cai, who went to Jones College Prep after spending his elementary school years at St. Therese’s Chinese Catholic School. “Then I was like, man, what is this white sauce? I just started putting it on everything. Fries, pizza. It was amazing.”

When he wanted a sauce for his salt and pepper chicken sandwich, it couldn’t just be his beloved mayo, so he checked his notes.

“I took the Honey Walnut Shrimp Glaze,” Cai said. He spiced it up, but subtly. “And it became my sauce.”

He declined to divulge the ingredients, for the sauce or the remarkably crispy crust, held in a soft brioche bun.

“It’s a special mixture of flour and starches that my old man taught me,” Cai said. His father was a chef in China and Belgium, before Chinatown in Chicago. “I put some extra stuff in there that isn’t traditionally used.”

The salt and pepper fried chicken sandwich, served with a side of colorful shrimp chips, captures the spirit of both crispy-skinned chicken, served whole at multi-course banquets, and street food in Hong Kong.

“My grandmother lived in Hong Kong,” Cai said. “We used to go back every summer and we stayed for about a month. I explored different types of food with my family, and I was like, “Wow, I love this place.”

This is where the idea for 3 Little Pigs was born, but not on the street.

“Maybe I was dreaming, but I think I went to McDonald’s there, and they were selling fried chicken and fried rice,” Cai said. “So I’m like, ‘Why can’t I bring back some Chinese food and put some American influences on it? I’m going to take a chicken sandwich, for example, and turn it into Chinese, sort of the reverse of what McDonald’s and KFC did.

What is clear, however, is that McDonald’s in Hong Kong, or its so-called Global Menu in the West Loop, can only dream of making fried chicken nuggets like the ones barely contained in an emperor’s box. 3 Little Pigs. You can order salt and pepper, or sweet and sour, or a combo, which I highly recommend, with a hot sauce on the side, topped with retro chunks of pineapple, peppers, and onions. Fragrant steamed white rice and a few florets of broccoli complete the oversized rice box, alongside twenty nuggets worthy of your inner empress.

For a restaurant that started on Instagram, it’s surprising that so few photos showed the pretty pink hue of 3LP fried rice, sprinkled with Chinese barbecue char siu, lap cheong sausage and spam. It’s beautifully balanced with silken eggs, plump peas and diced carrots, all generously packaged in a paper oyster bucket to-go box.

The build-your-own lo mein bar has plenty of options, using cabbage and scallions, but you should always include the aromatic fried garlic to enhance the impeccably stir-fried noodles.

The Rangoon Crab (folded into a triangle, as it should be, without breaking the Panda Express-style flowers) could use a little more stuffing, but it’s terribly crispy. The shrimp fried rice, as well as a custom creation of the build-your-own fried rice bar, lacked wok hei, the smoky breath of the wok that can be elusive. A mango smoothie with boba surprisingly lacked the boba, potentially disastrous if it had been a boba craving moment, but was otherwise floral with a wonderful texture.

The BBQ Pork Rice Box includes a fried egg on a bed of rice and a bright red serving of char siu in signature sauce. In the barbecue world, there are two camps: falling off the bone or biting the bone. The char siu falls in the first camp, even if it is pork butt, so there are no bones.

“Some people thought I vacuum-packed my pork,” Cai said. Sous vide is the vacuum bag method of cooking by immersing in water at a low temperature and for a long time that can result in super tender meat. “We didn’t use sous vide 80 or 90 years ago, and I’m not sous vide now. My ancestors would turn in their graves if I did that.

He sticks to traditional Chinese smoking methodology, but in a bespoke smokehouse, starting with fattier pork butt and ending with more saucy char siu.

“My char siu is traditional, but I just triple the amount of sauce on it,” Cai said. “So it has that kind of American barbecue vibe.”

I don’t think its vacuum ancestors would care, but I wondered if the tenderness was a result of the fattier cut and possibly a lower, longer smoke.

“I smoke a little longer than traditional barbecues,” Cai said. He also learned how to make Chinese barbecue from his father. ” But do not get me wrong. There are parts of the pork butt that are too lean for me, so we use the lean parts to make fried rice. The pork that’s in the fried rice is the same pork that we smoke on the same day.

This keen attention to detail has led 3 Little Pigs to cooking for friends, friends of friends, selling food to random strangers on Instagram, what he hopes will be a brick-and-mortar restaurant. mortar later this year.

“I wanted to take baby steps and just try things out,” Cai said. “But now we are there.”

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“It still sucks that I disappoint my parents,” he added. They wanted him to become a doctor, like so many Asian parents. “I just want to make them proud in a way that I think I can.”

Incidentally, Cai doesn’t like being called a leader, since he didn’t go to school for the title. He is a cook. The one whose work should make not only his parents proud, but also his ancestors.

3220 W. Grand Ave. (at Humboldt Park Eatery for pickup only, entrance at the white painted storefront)

3lpchi.com

To open: Tuesday to Sunday, noon to 8:30 p.m.; BBQ available after 1:30 p.m.; closed on Mondays

Prices: $5 (mango smoothie); $10.95 (salt and pepper fried chicken sandwich); $13.95 (3LP fried rice); $20.45 (Salt & Pepper & Sweet & Sour Chicken Combo Emperor Box)

Note from the podium: Very well

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Rick Steves on what Italians really think of American food https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/rick-steves-on-what-italians-really-think-of-american-food/ Sun, 08 May 2022 08:30:00 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/rick-steves-on-what-italians-really-think-of-american-food/ When Italians sit together for dinner, a special joy emerges from their mutual love of eating well: the flavors, the steam, the memories, the dreams…the edible heritage. Food is a favorite topic of conversation. And it seems every Italian has an opinion on American cuisine. Over a long Italian meal, my friend Claudia says she […]]]>

When Italians sit together for dinner, a special joy emerges from their mutual love of eating well: the flavors, the steam, the memories, the dreams…the edible heritage. Food is a favorite topic of conversation. And it seems every Italian has an opinion on American cuisine.

Over a long Italian meal, my friend Claudia says she loves American food. His favorites include the BLT sandwich and the “chili soup”. She is charmed by our breakfast culture and that we “meet for breakfast”. She says you would never see families going out for breakfast in Italy.

But she notes that in the United States, size matters more than quality, and dishes try too hard. She says the average number of ingredients in an American restaurant salad or pasta is 8 or 10, which is double the ingredients of the typical Italian salad or pasta. And she can’t understand our very fragrant salad dressings. “If your lettuce and tomato are good, why cover them with a thick dressing? We only use oil and vinegar,” she says. When I try to defend fancy dishes as complex, she says, “Maybe ‘pell-mell’ is a better translation.

My Tuscan friends praise the merits of their regional cuisine. In Florence, I join my friend Manfredo and his girlfriend Diana for dinner. She places a large plate of bruschetta in front of me. Each slice of toast looks like a little brown ship, with a toothpick mast on which floats a clove of garlic, as it sails its oily deck. We greedily destroy the well-arranged flotilla. Pulling up a mast and rubbing the sail on the crisp deck, I said, “My family eats bruschetta at home. But we all agree that it’s better in Italy.

“Real bruschetta needs real Tuscan bread,” says Manfredo. “This is made with only flour, water and yeast. No salt. Great today. Rock hard tomorrow.

Diana says: “Because bread ages quickly and we are a poor region, in Tuscany there are a lot of dishes made with yesterday’s bread.”

In unison, they go through a short list as if it were long: “Minestrone di pane, ribollita, pappa al pomodoro”.

Manfredo explains: “Ribollita is for the poor. You always cook and toss beans, cabbage, carrots, onions, old bread and olive oil for at least two hours. Very hearty. It is not good with fresh bread.

Manfredo picks up his knife, looks at the lasagna on the large plate in front of him. “In America, a restaurant doesn’t look for what is good food. What is good is what sells. He sticks his knife through two inches of hot lasagna. “Real lasagna is only so thick. In the States they make it twice as thick,” he says, flipping another portion on top, “and they fill it with mozzarella. Then he says, ‘He there is no mozzarella in the lasagna.”

Diana laughs in agreement.

After a sip of wine, Manfredo continues, “If you go to an American restaurant and say the food is bad, you get a coupon for a free meal. No more bad food. If you say the food is bad in a restaurant in Italy, you get fired. To get free food here, it’s the other way around. You say, ‘This is the best steak I’ve ever eaten.’ The chef will then say, “You have to try the dessert. You say ‘Oh no.’ He says: ‘Here. Please. Take it for free. ‘”

Diana says: “In a real Italian restaurant, when you complain, the chef will tell you, ‘I cooked this when I was a kid like my grandmother cooked it. It can’t be wrong.

I ask, “What do you think of French cuisine?”

Manfredo, spicing up a puddle of oil on a small plate, replies, “The French make fine sauces to help mediocre ingredients taste. Among the French there are two wonderful things: their wine and their art. Since the time of Napoleon, they only think about their wine and their art. In the south, they are like the Italians. But of Paris and the north, they are so proud that they are bored.

Tearing off a piece of bread and dabbing it in oil, Diana said, “For me, French cheese is Italian cheese with mold. If we have cheese that doesn’t sell, it molds. After a few days, it’s perfect for the French.

Raising my glass of wine, I toast to Italian cuisine: “To cucina italiana!

Manfredo follows this by saying magnanimously, “Bacon and eggs!”

We all agree that American breakfasts can’t be beat.

“Omelettes, hash browns…” recalls Manfredo with a nostalgic sigh. “During my last visit to New York, I gained four pounds in three weeks.”

Raising our glasses filled with good vino rosso, we all say: “At the American breakfasts!

Edmonds resident Rick Steves (www.ricksteves.com) writes European travel guides, hosts travel shows on public television and radio, and organizes European tours. This article was adapted from his new book, “For the Love of Europe”. You can email Rick at rick@ricksteves.com and follow his blog on Facebook.


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This beautiful new restaurant on Market Street serves unique Latin American cuisine! https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/this-beautiful-new-restaurant-on-market-street-serves-unique-latin-american-cuisine/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 01:45:02 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/this-beautiful-new-restaurant-on-market-street-serves-unique-latin-american-cuisine/ Sometimes throughout the week we feel a bit down. But, as we all know, food is the best way to feel cooler again! At Sol & Luna, you will experience beautiful decor, great service, and most importantly, amazing food! They serve Latin American dishes that are exploding with various flavors and spices from these different […]]]>

Sometimes throughout the week we feel a bit down. But, as we all know, food is the best way to feel cooler again! At Sol & Luna, you will experience beautiful decor, great service, and most importantly, amazing food! They serve Latin American dishes that are exploding with various flavors and spices from these different regions!

Amazing Latin American food in Market Street

Photo: @solandluna.sg (Instagram)

Sol and Luna give off a kind of homey vibe with their interior design and overall atmosphere. Almost every piece of furniture and decoration is made of wood, giving you the feeling of being connected to nature. The large clear windows allow guests to have an unobstructed view of the Singapore skyline. A perfectly soothing vibe that pairs perfectly with their amazing food! The perfect place for an evening with your loved ones!

Picture: @solandluna.sg (Instagram)

At night is when the restaurant really comes alive! They use warm, slightly orange tones for their lights as well as their seats. This gives the place extra warmth, especially on cold nights. The view is even more amplified, you will be able to see each building light up from the comfort of your table while you enjoy your meal! This restaurant is the perfect date.

Shark Bay Grilled Australian Tiger Prawns ($25.00)

Photo: @euniceq (Instagram)

For an appetizer, you can’t go wrong with their grilled tiger prawns. This dish is the perfect starter for your meals. It’s light, refreshing and we want more! It features perfectly grilled tiger prawns lightly seasoned with salt and pepper, sweet white corn and a refreshing tomato salsa. The prawns alone are incredibly sweet and meaty, but paired with the other components it becomes an elevated experience!

Truffle Risotto ($25.00)

Picture: @euniceq (Instagram)

For those who want something more “chic”, try their famous truffle risotto. It is a blend of rich, cheesy and earthy flavors. The grain used for risotto is short and cooked with broth for some time, making each bite tastier than the last. This whole dish is filled with truffles! From the start of cooking, they use truffle oil and truffle and mushroom paste. They use an incredible cheese to complement the already rich dish, the Grana Padano. You can even choose to add fresh truffle on top for an additional price! It is the great taste of luxury.

Sol & Luna Stewed Welsh Lamb ($32.00)

Photo: @euniceq (Instagram)

For the star of the show, their 12 hours of slow-cooked Welsh lamb. This dish is perfectly rustic, rich and flavorful, and yet you will never tire of eating it. They slowly braise the lamb until fork tender, so you can cut it with just one spoon! The Borderlaise sauce is also rich and meaty, giving this dish extra body and flavor! A perfect way to end the day!

Head to Sol & Luna today!

Take note that they are usually open from 11:00 am, making them the perfect place for lunch and dinner if you are in the area! If you ever fancy something new, this place is worth a visit! What are you waiting for? Hurry today!

Address: 88 Market St, #17-01, CapitaSpring 048948

Business hours : Every day, from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., Saturday opens from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., Sunday opens from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

For more food, check out This famous halal-certified restaurant on Kandahar Street serves unique Tulang Merah!

Cover picture: @solandluna.sg (Instagram), @euniceq (Instagram)

We would like to invite you to join our New Private Community Group! Here you are free to ask questions, share your love for food and explore the Singapore community! We will also regularly post occasional promotions and the latest discoveries.

Click the button below and hunt for good food with us today!

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6 Most Shocking Truths About America’s Food Industry – Eat This Not That https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/6-most-shocking-truths-about-americas-food-industry-eat-this-not-that/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 14:35:00 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/6-most-shocking-truths-about-americas-food-industry-eat-this-not-that/ You’ve probably heard of some of the (gross) things fast food chains do behind the scenes. After all, it’s hard to forget the hot fudge/moldy caramel sundae situation at McDonald’s revealed by a former employee. But the reality is that these secrets live on through the entire the food industry in America, not just fast […]]]>

You’ve probably heard of some of the (gross) things fast food chains do behind the scenes. After all, it’s hard to forget the hot fudge/moldy caramel sundae situation at McDonald’s revealed by a former employee.

But the reality is that these secrets live on through the entire the food industry in America, not just fast food. And it’s much worse than moldy ice cream…

The truth about how our food is made, processed, and marketed has large-scale effects that, over time, can harm our environment and our health.

Read on to find out the most shocking truths about America’s food industry, and then check out 8 Steakhouse Secrets You Don’t Want You To Know.

iStock/Savushkin

It’s no surprise that so many people are adopting vegan and vegetarian diets given this fact, as reported animal equality. Not only are these animals killed, but they suffer cruel treatment in factory farms. Chickens are raised in sheds with thousands of other birds, mother sheep are separated from their newborn lambs, turkeys are (unintentionally) boiled alive and cows have their horns cut off. So before you order a McDonald’s Big Mac or Shake Shack Chick’n Shack, take a look at some of their vegan and vegetarian options.

dark chocolate
Shutterstock

According to Water Footprint Network, a 100 gram chocolate bar “costs” 1,700 liters of water, which equals approximately 449 gallons. How is it possible ? Well, the road from cocoa beans to chocolate is a long one. Between cocoa paste, cocoa butter and cocoa powder, the amount of water needed for the production process adds up.

cheeseburger
Shutterstock

Did you think you were eating meat from just one cow in this cheeseburger? Think again. Meat producers often combine meat from several cows into a single product.

McDonald’s, for example, confirmed that his beef patties may contain meat from a hundred different animals. And the same goes for store-bought ground beef. According to The Washington Posta Costco employee in the fresh meats department didn’t know the exact number of cows in a single package, “But it’s more than a few,” he said.

food waste
Shutterstock

In 2010, the The United States Department of Agriculture reported around 133 billion pounds of food wasted, which is $161 billion worth of food. Waste occurs throughout the food industry, whether at the agricultural, restaurant or consumer level. However, the United States is currently trying to reduce food waste, with the aim of reduce it by 50% by 2030.

woman reading the ingredients on the box
Shutterstock

This box of cookies could contain a lot more calories than the company suggests. the FDA States that nutrition labels can be up to 20% inaccurate. With such a margin of error, we can only assume that the calorie count is not what the food industry wants us to believe.

table covered with bowls of popcorn, chips, candy and other junk food
Shutterstock / beats1

It’s all too easy to eat an entire bag of Doritos or Lays in one sitting, and there’s a reason for that. In 2013, The New York Times reported on the strategic calculations that go into recipes for highly processed foods: Their flavors are meant to make your brain crave more. It is no wonder that the CDC reports adult obesity in America will reach 42.4% in 2017-2018.

Want to learn more about the secrets of the food industry? Discover 20 secrets McDonald’s staff won’t tell you.

Mia Salas

Mia is a freelance writer for several publications and soon to be graduating from Princeton University with a degree in English. Read more

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Londoners fume as US food critic slams Hawksmoor restaurant and is ‘amazed English food can be good’ https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/londoners-fume-as-us-food-critic-slams-hawksmoor-restaurant-and-is-amazed-english-food-can-be-good/ Fri, 08 Apr 2022 15:47:04 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/londoners-fume-as-us-food-critic-slams-hawksmoor-restaurant-and-is-amazed-english-food-can-be-good/ A US food critic is facing the wrath of Londoners online after reviewing Hawkmoor’s new New York restaurant. Jiayang Fan wrote a review of the restaurant for The New Yorker titled “Delicious finds in Hawksmoor”. In the article In conclusion, Jiayang wrote, “It was late in the meal when I decided to have a cocktail. […]]]>

A US food critic is facing the wrath of Londoners online after reviewing Hawkmoor’s new New York restaurant. Jiayang Fan wrote a review of the restaurant for The New Yorker titled “Delicious finds in Hawksmoor”.

In the article In conclusion, Jiayang wrote, “It was late in the meal when I decided to have a cocktail. I had been afraid to do it because I was sure the drinks in an English steakhouse would be so stiff that a light weight like me would need to be sent home. I was happy to be wrong.

And while that part was probably justified – Brits are good at managing their booze – it was the next part that angered the internet: “That must be why, when I ordered the sticky caramel pudding, ‘the most English dessert on the menu,” according to my waiter, I emboldened myself to tell him how amazed I was that something so English could taste so good. My companion tried to silence me, but it was too late. The waiter nodded with a smile. Wasn’t the first time he’d heard that sentiment.”

READ MORE:The best place for a roast dinner in each London borough according to TripAdvisor

And Londoners are not happy with the insinuation that good British food is surprising. Taking to Twitter, journalist and writer Robert Colvile shared the article and wrote “New Yorker criticizes Hawksmoor, discovers new depths of culinary condescension towards English people”, adding “We’re actually pretty good at food! We have been for a while!” And the responses from Londoners were quick to pour in.

“Oh yes, the culinary condescension of the land of cookies and gravy. And oatmeal,” one person wrote, and another added, “Imagine being an American, where putting a pickle on something counts as class, and criticizing the food from other countries.” One person joked “If the New Yorker had any guts, he’d review Greggs.” and another said “This from canned cheese country.”

“I find this especially annoying considering the awful pit that is the majority of American food culture,” another person wrote. “Excuse me while I go fry this turkey.” And the backlash grew so much online that even Hawksmoor’s story itself chimed in, referencing Robert’s original Tweet: “This isn’t the first reaction I’ve seen from a very positive Hawksmoor review. New York that takes umbrage at a certain view of English cuisine.As a recipient of criticism and a man with a foot in both cities, here are some thoughts…

“First, no one should take offense on our behalf (not that they are!). Hawksmoor NYC is uprising and New Yorkers seem to really like it. Sure there were questions, but for the most part they were answered. We all know where prejudice comes from, we know it’s outdated, and I think it’s good to tackle it head-on. I know we (Hawksmoor) are really proud to challenge him and do so well there.

“New York is an amazing city. It feels like the center of the world. Yes, it’s also a bit narrow and parochial view, but I’m not sure we Brits are entirely innocent in this regard. This is absolutely part of what makes it such a magical place. New York is more like London than either cares to admit. I like both of them. They are full of people who are proud to be New Yorkers or Londoners, and actually welcome newcomers from elsewhere. Certainly ours.”

Do you have a food story you think we should cover? If so, email whatson@mylondon.news or lea.seeberg@reachplc.com

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The Atlanta subway spots that inspired Eric Kim’s cookbook, Korean American: Food That Tastes Like Home https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/the-atlanta-subway-spots-that-inspired-eric-kims-cookbook-korean-american-food-that-tastes-like-home/ Fri, 01 Apr 2022 19:49:32 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/the-atlanta-subway-spots-that-inspired-eric-kims-cookbook-korean-american-food-that-tastes-like-home/ Skillet Japchae with Roasted Mushrooms – check out the recipe below!© 2022 Jenny Huang. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Random House. For his first cookbook, Eric Kim originally planned to visit other cities and ask other people’s families what they ate. He had previously published work that touched on the Atlanta area, where […]]]>
Skillet Japchae with Roasted Mushrooms – check out the recipe below!

© 2022 Jenny Huang. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Random House.

For his first cookbook, Eric Kim originally planned to visit other cities and ask other people’s families what they ate. He had previously published work that touched on the Atlanta area, where he was born and raised: in 2018, for example, writing for Food52, he prefaced a recipe for his mother’s kimchi fried rice with the story of hanging out with his parents over salmon skin rolls and hot sake at Sushi Yoko in Norcross. But Kim, now a New Yorker and columnist for the New York Times– changed the premise of the book during the pandemic, when he spent nine months in confinement with his family in the northern suburbs. “Coming home made me realize how much I was staying in this city that I took for granted until recently,” Kim says.

Korean American: cuisine that tastes like home expands on his family history, which is closely tied to the growing Korean population of the Atlanta metropolitan area, the largest in the South. Kim’s book reinterprets the KFC cookie her father sought out after he arrived in Georgia in 1983. In some recipes, like chicken tacos, jalapeños replace kkwarigochu (aka shishito) peppers because her parents didn’t have access to the latter—at least, until the neighborhood H Mart arrived. The Crispy Lemon Pepper Bulgogi is, of course, inspired by “Atlanta’s deep and passionate Lemon Pepper fan base.” And the dessert chapter begins with the story of White Windmill, the local bakery chain and gathering place for Korean immigrants like Kim’s mother, Jean.

“This book isn’t just about Jean, my family, or Korean American cuisine,” Kim writes. “It’s also a love letter to Atlanta. A place, a feeling, an era. I asked him to tell me about some spots in the Atlanta area that inspired me korean american.

Yoko-Sushi
[State Route] 141 is our yellow brick road. You go through Oasis [Goodtime Emporium] and Krystal, who is so good when you’ve had a little drink. Good to have these staples, and Sushi Yoko was our staple. My parents work on Buford Highway, and our church was there, so it was always on the way. My mother used to say, “I don’t feel like working today. Should we stop at Sushi Yoko? I’m like “Yeah!” and she would make an abrupt right to go. 7124 Peachtree Industrial Boulevard, Norcross

Korean American: cuisine that tastes like home
Cooking with fire at Kani House

Photograph by Andrew Lyman

Kani House
It’s fun to do the stupid hibachi dance and have shrimp thrown in your mouth. But really, the reason I like going there is because of that high heat, like with the kalbi. You can only get that kind of char on the zucchini and onions there because of that fire on that griddle. 10820 Abbotts Bridge Road, Duluth

Sumo Hibachi & Wings
Korean fried chicken stays crispy because it’s double fried and the sugar in the candy glazes a bit. It’s like [Aunt Georgia’s] Fried chicken with soy sauce [with Jalapeños] in my book. But Sumo’s glaze is special. They use pepper and lemon juice, but what they do is different is they use lemon extract. Koreans make fruit syrups by letting the fruit harden with sugar for a long time. If you cook lemon juice and reduce it, it loses that shine. So, it’s great to use this Korean syrup. 5450 Peachtree Parkway, Peachtree Corners, 678-691-5884

Korean American: cuisine that tastes like home
Albap to Kang Nam

Photograph by Andrew Lyman

Korean American: cuisine that tastes like home
Kangnam

Photograph by Andrew Lyman

Kangnam
During the pandemic, we were ordering their sushi platters. But once there, you order the set menu. They give you hobakjuk first – I love this porridge because it’s pure kabocha squash taste. You might have it at your grandma’s house, but no one else does it anymore because it takes forever. They take out the albap, which I have a version of in my book. Theirs is basic, which is the best, honestly: it’s rice, sesame oil and multicolored flying fish eggs, where each egg has a different flavor. 5715 Buford Highway, Doraville

Korean American: cuisine that tastes like home
Stocked shelves at Buford Highway Farmers Market

Photograph by Andrew Lyman

Buford Highway Farmer’s Market
I started my job [at the Times] in Atlanta in February [2021]. I was testing recipes for my colleague, Nigerian food writer Yewande Komolafe. I had to find red palm oil, really specific root vegetables, and ingredients that I wouldn’t find anywhere else. Buford Highway Farmers Market isn’t just a place to buy these things; it’s a place where these communities also have that connection to their home. 5600 Buford Highway, Doraville

Receipts

Plate Japchae with Roasted Wild Mushrooms
For 4 to 6 people

8 ounces dried dangmyeon (sweet potato noodles)
1 pound wild mushrooms, such as oyster mushrooms, shiitake mushrooms (stems removed) and chanterelles, torn into bite-sized pieces
5 large green onions, cut into 3-inch lengths
Olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 tbsp plus 1 tsp soy sauce
1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
1 tablespoon of maple syrup
1 large garlic clove, finely grated
Toasted sesame seeds, for serving

  1. Place a rack as close to the broil element as possible and preheat the broil.
  2. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and cook the dangmyeon according to package directions.
  3. Meanwhile, arrange the mushrooms and green onions on a baking sheet and toss with a little olive oil. Broil and roast until deeply caramelized and crispy, about 5 minutes. Watch them carefully. Remove the skillet from the oven and season with salt and pepper.
  4. In a small bowl, whisk together the soy sauce, sesame oil, brown sugar, maple syrup and garlic. When the noodles are cooked, drain them and add them directly to the plate with the roasted mushrooms. Pour the dressing over the noodles and toss everything together with tongs.
  5. To serve, transfer the japchae to a large platter and sprinkle with sesame seeds.
Korean American: cuisine that tastes like home
Crunchy Lemon Pepper Bulgogi with Pickled Shallots

© 2022 Jenny Huang. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Random House.

Crunchy Lemon Pepper Bulgogi with Pickled Shallots
For 4 people

Grated zest and juice of 1 large lemon
2 shallots, thinly sliced
Kosher salt
1 tablespoon black peppercorns
1 teaspoon demerara sugar (like raw sugar)
½ teaspoon garlic powder
1 pound thinly sliced ​​ribeye (or other meat for bulgogi-style dishes; see Tip)
Vegetable oil
1 jalapeño, thinly sliced ​​into rounds
Fresh coriander leaves and tender stems, lots
Cooked white rice, for serving

  1. Preheat the oven to 170°F.
  2. Spread the lemon zest evenly on a baking sheet and bake until completely dry, 20 to 30 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, combine lemon juice and shallots in a small bowl, season with salt, toss and set aside to marinate quickly.
  4. Add the dried lemon zest and black peppercorns to a spice grinder or mortar/pestle and grind until coarse. Transfer to a small bowl and stir in 1 tsp salt, demerara sugar and garlic powder.
  5. Use a paper towel to pat the meat dry and spread it out on a cutting board or baking sheet in a single layer. Season both sides with lemon pepper.
  6. Heat a large grill pan or skillet until very, very hot (you can see a wisp of smoke rising from the surface) and add enough oil to lightly coat the bottom. Add the bulgogi to the pan in a single layer and cook until crispy and golden brown, about 1 minute on the first side and literally a few seconds on the second. You may need to work in batches so as not to overload the pan. Transfer to a plate and garnish with the pickled shallots, jalapeño and cilantro. Serve with white rice.

Point If you can’t find bulgogi-style beef, you can make it yourself: place a boneless rib eye in the freezer for a few minutes to firm it up, then thinly slice it with a sharp knife.

Sheet-by-sheet version Instead of searing in a pan, you can actually drizzle the meat with a little oil and grill it on the top rack until crispy and nicely browned, 2-3 minutes (watch it carefully so that it does not burn). This will only work with very hot broilers. If you think this is not the case, stick to the pan-frying method in the recipe.

Recipes reprinted from korean american. Copyright © 2022 Eric Kim.

This article originally appeared in our May 2022 issue.

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El Coqui Puerto Rican Cuisine – Best Latin American Cuisine https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/el-coqui-puerto-rican-cuisine-best-latin-american-cuisine/ Wed, 23 Mar 2022 07:04:16 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/el-coqui-puerto-rican-cuisine-best-latin-american-cuisine/ Guests in search of homemade Puerto Rican food will come from as far away as Sacramento or Santa Cruz to eat Chef Jacqueline Roman’s dishes at El Coqui in Santa Rosa. “We have customers who burst into tears,” Jacqueline’s partner and co-owner Tina Jackson said. “They’ll tell us it tastes like their mother’s. Or their […]]]>

Guests in search of homemade Puerto Rican food will come from as far away as Sacramento or Santa Cruz to eat Chef Jacqueline Roman’s dishes at El Coqui in Santa Rosa.

“We have customers who burst into tears,” Jacqueline’s partner and co-owner Tina Jackson said. “They’ll tell us it tastes like their mother’s. Or their grandmother’s. The big tattooed ones came in and cried.

Jacqueline is proud of the fact that her little kitchen is reminiscent of the one her grandmother taught her to cook in. She was raised in New York by this grandmother, who was born in the mountainous rainforest of Jayuya, Puerto Rico. And she’s thrilled to offer dishes that aren’t common in the Bay Area.

When Jacqueline creates her classic sofrito sauce from scratch, she doesn’t just make dishes with fresh tomatoes, garlic, cilantro, onions and peppers. She also talks about what her grandmother told her to do with every meal she serves: “Make your food with love.”

el coqui best latin american food napa sonoma california

That also goes for its simple bean, rice and plantain dish, fruit sangria and its signature Pollo Al Horno – spiced baked chicken thighs so tender the meat falls off the bone.

Her grandmother’s wise teachings paid off. El Coqui has won numerous awards, including gold at the Sonoma County Harvest Fair for the dish Pollo Al Horno.

And the restaurant won the best Latin cuisine category in the Bohemian several times, as well as the best new restaurant in the Santa Rosa Press Democrat. El Coqui has also been featured on the Food Network.

Jacqueline and Tina have started an unusual restaurant.

Tina bought furniture and Jacqueline was her saleswoman. They succeeded. And they decided to open a Puerto Rican restaurant together “at the height of the financial crisis,” Tina said. “It was a crazy time.”

They opened El Coqui in 2009, with second-hand equipment which they bought cheaply, as many other restaurants were closing at that time.

El Coqui was built with “sweat fairness,” Tina said. “We mostly did it with our own hands.”

el coqui restaurant staff, best latin american food in north bay

At the time, their vision was that they might be lucky enough to build a “little hole in the wall with four or five employees,” Tina said.

But they thought too small.

They now have about two dozen employees and thousands of customers visit El Coqui every week.

Just recently, customers were filling the front patio, salsa music was playing in the background, and everyone’s mug was overflowing with homemade sangria.

“The vibe was so good,” Tina said. “Our vision turned out to be much bigger and much more amazing than we thought.”


El Coqui Puerto Rican Cuisine

400 Mendocino Avenue
Santa Rosa, California 95401
707.542.8868
ElCoqui2eat.com

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5 American Food Ingredients Banned In Other Countries – Eat This Not That https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/5-american-food-ingredients-banned-in-other-countries-eat-this-not-that/ Wed, 23 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/5-american-food-ingredients-banned-in-other-countries-eat-this-not-that/ You might assume that everything in the foods you buy at the grocery store is safe to eat, but it turns out that a closer look at the ingredients in your groceries might reveal some nasty surprises. Some ingredients are currently used in commercial foods in the United States, but have been banned in other […]]]>

You might assume that everything in the foods you buy at the grocery store is safe to eat, but it turns out that a closer look at the ingredients in your groceries might reveal some nasty surprises.

Some ingredients are currently used in commercial foods in the United States, but have been banned in other countries for various reasons. Bess Berger, women’s health dietitian and owner of Feeding by Bessrevealed that the United States may not have the strictest ingredient regulations.

“Many Americans don’t realize that the bar for what we accept as food, or what we generally consider safe, is lower than the standard in very many countries.”

This includes the following ingredients that you may not necessarily want to consume on a regular basis.

Michael D Edwards/Shutterstock

Brominated vegetable oil (BVO) “is a common additive in citrus sodas, such as Mountain Dew,” says Berger. Indeed, BVO is “sometimes used to prevent citrus flavor from separating in sodas and other beverages,” according to the Mayo Clinic.

At the same time, BVO “contains bromine which may be linked to skin irritations, headaches, memory loss and balance disorders,” Berger points out while noting that Europe, the India and Japan have all banned the questionable ingredient. Although not illegal to use in the United States, PepsiCo Inc has agreed to stop adding BVO to its Gatorade drinks after a Mississippi teenager started a petition to encourage the company to drop the potentially worrying substance, for Reuters.

ruffled potato chips
Shutterstock

If you were around and snacked in the 90s, you might have heard that certain items such as “diet” versions of Pringles, Ruffles and Doritos were linked to various unfortunate health issues like cramps, diarrhea and “loose stools”. “, or what was then called a “faecal emergency” and “anal leakage”, according to Mental Floss.

The source of the problem was apparently olestra, which was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in early 1996. Intended for use as a grease replacement in calorie-free, fat-free and cholesterol-free foodsolestra has been shown to cause adverse side effects, which is why it is not used in Canada and the European Union, explains Izma Almasar, nutritionist at Honest Brand Reviews.

White bread
Shutterstock

An additive that is used for cooking, potassium bromate is something you could find in your bread. A review found in the scientific journal food chemistry further explains that it is “an oxidizing agent and one of the best and cheapest dough improvers in the baking industry”. It is also an additive that causes cancer in rodents. According to data published by the journal Environmental Health Perspectivespotassium bromate “is carcinogenic in rats and nephrotoxic in man and laboratory animals when administered orally”.

Although potassium bromate is still used in the United States, Almasar notes that it is banned in Canada, the European Union and China. Live Science points out that it is also not used in Brazil or other countries.

butter
Shutterstock

While butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) have complicated names, they are simply synthetic antioxidants used as food preservatives. BHA is found in processed foods and beverages such as meat, cereals, chips, butter, and beer, and BHT is used in meat and snacks as well as gum, baked foods, and dehydrated foods, Very well adjusted.

Although BHA and BHT are widely used in the United States, they are known to cause allergic reactions. BHA too”interferes with hormonal function“, while BHT is toxic to rodents, “may act as a tumor promoter in certain situations” and has “effects[ed] in reproductive disorders [a]effects.” Naturally, both are banned in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Japan, as well as Europe, according to Long live.

Fortunately for those in the United States who might be concerned about consuming foods containing BHA or BHT, Almasar says both are “considered safe for use in foods when the total antioxidant content is less than 0. .02”.

Tinctures
Shutterstock

There are a wide variety of colorings used to make our foods more colorful and appealing. However, while the United States allows dyes such as Yellow #6 and Red #40 to be used in products that may end up on your table, Berger says many European countries do not allow this. artificial coloring in their food.

“For example, if you buy M&M’s in Europe, they are colored with natural food coloring. The same goes for Skittles. Concretely, Red 40, Blue 1, Yellow 5, Yellow 6 are prohibited” , she explains. “Additionally, these colorants are common in sodas and sports drinks, and icing.”

Why are they banned in Europe? According to Berger, “these food colorings are linked to hyperactivity and inattention in children.”

To learn more about what your food might contain, be sure to read 25 Horrible Ingredients Everyone Still Uses, But Shouldn’t!

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American food blogger declares T&T the food capital of the Caribbean https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/american-food-blogger-declares-tt-the-food-capital-of-the-caribbean/ Sun, 20 Mar 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/american-food-blogger-declares-tt-the-food-capital-of-the-caribbean/ On the fifth day of his visit to Trinidad and Tobago, David Hoffman hit the proverbial wall. After spending about three hours filming Aunty Doll in her famous Chula kitchen in Siparia and tasting the 21 dishes she cooked, which included paratha, pepper roti, dhalpuri, ham, macaroni pie and saheena, he settled in a hammock […]]]>

On the fifth day of his visit to Trinidad and Tobago, David Hoffman hit the proverbial wall.

After spending about three hours filming Aunty Doll in her famous Chula kitchen in Siparia and tasting the 21 dishes she cooked, which included paratha, pepper roti, dhalpuri, ham, macaroni pie and saheena, he settled in a hammock and fell asleep.

It was the first time in his culinary adventures in Trinidad that the amount of food and carbohydrates took him out.

Hoffman is an American food vlogger who spent the last week at T&T walking down the rabbit hole of the different foods the country has to offer.

Popular dishes such as Patsy’s Bake and Shark on Maracas Bay, wild meat doubles and roti cooked by the Caura River, channa sandwiches at Nick’s Café in Charlieville and Scorpion pepper ice cream at AJ’s, Hoffman ate his way through the twin island.

“Trinidad is the food capital of the Caribbean,” he told Loop News when we joined him on his culinary adventure on Wednesday. “Obviously I haven’t been to every country in the Caribbean, so please don’t be mad at me, but this is a foodie destination.”

Hoffman travels the world extensively, documenting his culinary adventures and educating his nearly one million subscribers on his YouTube channel. David came here aabout food in different countries.

David Hoffman taking a short nap after tasting more than 21 dishes from Aunt Doll. Photo: David Wears

T&T is the third country he has visited in the past six weeks and his 87and globally.

“Trinidad has been on my list for a long time. I have a list, it’s basically all the countries I’ve been to and want to go. Obviously the pandemic interrupted the course but last year I saw things start to open up and I posted it on my community wall that I was looking to go to Trinidad and all the world was like Chef Jason Peru was your man,” said Hoffman, who enjoys connecting with locals on the ground to help him have an authentic experience.

“When he contacted me via Instagram, I researched him and when I saw the kind of work he did, I was amazed that he did it out of pure love and passion. for the food. We traded numbers and it took three months to plan it, but we knew it was going to blow up and be extremely amazing,” Peru told Loop.

Along with his friend, popular foodie David Wears, Peru came up with a plan for Hoffman that took into account diverse ethnicities, cultures and geographic locations.

Before his trip, Hoffman, through his Trini friends in the United States, knew that our society was a fusion of ethnicities and he tasted doubles in Little Guyana in New York.

“But until you get here, you don’t know anything,” he said, citing people as his biggest surprise.

“I’ve been to countries where it’s really difficult because people are not accommodating but here, from the second I landed, going through immigration, people were so welcoming. I travel for the culture and the food, but the people are what make the travel experience. Without the people, the experience is incomplete,” he said.

David Hoffman and chef Jason Peru at Aunt Doll’s in Siparia

While he said the double is his favorite, he described Bake and Shark as amazing.

“This is my ultimate seafood sandwich. I’m a big fish sandwich guy, but this was out of this world,” he said.

Hoffman started his YouTube channel in 2008 as a basic travel vlog, but in 2017 he focused more on food when he realized the content was getting the most views.

His main goal, he said, is to get people to go to the places he features.

“I’m really proud to come out, to dive really deep into the culture. I’m here alone and I’m always with locals so I really immerse myself in the culture and that’s what I want to convey to my audience, really show them that it’s a safe country, there’s amazing food, great people, that’s why you should come. I always emphasize positivity, I’m not into negativity, politics, I just really want people to understand that even though every place is different, we’re just people,” he said. Explain.

“I encourage people to get out of their comfort zone. Some people in America are stuck in two countries, Canada and Mexico, so I really push people out of their comfort zone and explore with deeper connections. I believe in going further into rural areas, I’m all about village life because that’s where the real people live.

When asked if he saw any similarities between T&T’s food and what he had in other countries, Hoffman said the main comparison was with India where he had been five times.

“Double is like Chole Batura, it’s a breakfast dish, massive puri with channa. I think double is better because it’s tasty with the mixture of peppers, chutneys, tamarind but I see a lot of fusion, especially from India, and then you have Chinese food, Venezuelan food with ingredients from Trinidad, so you have this beautiful mix. The food here is amazing,” he said.

Hoffman, whose parents are Venezuelan, also had the chance to sample authentic Venezuelan cuisine at Anndres Restaurant in Chaguanas.

“Amazing experience, the food is as authentic as it gets, it was delicious,” he said.

Watching Hoffman navigate his camera, adjusting the lens with one hand as he swallows dhalpuri with pumpkin from the leaf Aunt Doll has laid the food on, it’s clear that while he enjoys tasting the culture of others, creating content is work.

The 36-year-old man, who was named in the Top 10 Best Travel Videographers by USA Today, Top 10 Travel Video Sites by OOAWorld and awarded the Travel Video Alliance Award for Best Food Video/Series in 2020, says his work is hectic. His team posts at least two videos a day and although YouTube is his main platform, he also creates content for Tik Tok, Instagram Reels and Facebook.

Between monitoring edited products, he’s a lot on the road. Over the past six weeks, he has traveled to Lebanon and Oman while returning to Miami to spend time with his two daughters.

After Trinidad, Hoffman has tentative plans to visit Nicaragua, Iran, Guyana and Saudi Arabia in the coming months.

As he makes money on all social media platforms from watching his videos, Hoffman is diversifying his brand into products. By the end of May, he will launch his own line of spicy sauces made with pineapple and guava and has a long-term vision to get into real estate around the world to help boost tourism.

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