American food – Were Cooking Restaurants USA http://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 20:45:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg American food – Were Cooking Restaurants USA http://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/ 32 32 MAIZ fills a Latin American food niche in Brunswick – The Bowdoin Orient https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/maiz-fills-a-latin-american-food-niche-in-brunswick-the-bowdoin-orient/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 07:31:38 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/maiz-fills-a-latin-american-food-niche-in-brunswick-the-bowdoin-orient/ Chayma CharifiFOOD FOR THE SOUL: An order of Chori, served with a creamy sauce, is piping hot and fresh from the kitchen. This Colombian cuisine is on the menu at MAIZ, a new Colombian restaurant located at 11 Pleasant Street. MAIZ, a popular Colombian street food restaurant in Portland, recently opened a location on Pleasant […]]]>
Chayma Charifi
FOOD FOR THE SOUL: An order of Chori, served with a creamy sauce, is piping hot and fresh from the kitchen. This Colombian cuisine is on the menu at MAIZ, a new Colombian restaurant located at 11 Pleasant Street.

MAIZ, a popular Colombian street food restaurant in Portland, recently opened a location on Pleasant Street in Brunswick. The space is the owners’ third culinary venture, the first of which was a food truck called La Fritanga that serves a set of dishes similar to their two restaurants.

The company is owned by the couple Martha Leonard and Niky Walters. Leonard emphasized authenticity as one of the company’s initial goals. The couple aim to honor the heritage of South American cuisine, especially Colombian cuisine.

“My husband is from Cartagena, Colombia…we used to live there, moved away and came to Maine with the intention of creating a kind of fast casual space that could celebrate his hometown street food” , Leonard said.

MAIZ fills a regional niche previously absent from Brunswick as one of the few Latin American restaurants – and the first Colombian restaurant – in the city. Leonard wants the business to serve as a cultural center for the community.

“Not only do we sell food, but we also look to organize dance parties, events [and cooking classes]said Leonardo.

MAIZ is a bilingual operation, with nearly all employees fluent in both Spanish and English. Leonard said this ensures staff can accommodate customers who speak either language. She also highlighted the particularly rewarding interactions that come from the cultural diversity of cuisine.

“We have people who up until now have always spoken Spanish and always worked in Spanish-speaking environments, and then we have [staff] who are learning Spanish,” Leonard said.

Ella Martin ’24 worked at MAIZ as a bartender this summer and says that focus on providing flexible work opportunities was noticeable.

“Most of the employees are either first generation[eration] students on student visas… One of the main objectives of the owners was to provide jobs for first-generation students, Latinos and Central Americans in general,” Martin said.

The MAIZ menu consists primarily of arepas – grilled pockets of dough made from ground corn – stuffed with meats, cheeses, vegetables and other additions. The restaurant also serves pasabocas, or snacks, such as miniature arepas, empanadas, chorizo ​​skewers, and yuca.

Leonard said the corn milling process is central to MAIZ’s menu. The restaurant aims to grind 100% of its own corn in the future. Many techniques and processes used to prepare the food honor the roots of the region from which the dishes originate.

“From beginning to end, [the staff] grind corn and make arepas completely from scratch…they also make empanadas from scratch. You can just say that even though it’s technically fast food, there’s a lot of care that goes into it and everything is homemade,” Martin said.

Ugne Stasiukynaite ’24 recently visited the restaurant for a birthday party and says she enjoyed her experience.

“I really like the bright lights and everything. It was a big space, so it made for easy conversations, and the food was really good too. So it was really fun,” Stasiukynaite said.

The restaurant has been a success so far, but Leonard and Walter have many plans for MAIZ’s future.

“Right now, we’re really focusing on the Brunswick location. We really want to push our cultural activities. We are also working hard to [open] a mini market in front of the store,” Leonard said.

Leonard says the mini-market will offer arepas, empanadas, pan de bono and other MAIZ dishes, as well as other goodies from Colombia and other surrounding countries. It will also aim to have a space showcasing local Latinx artisans and artists.

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Pedro’s South American Food will open La Cocina Del Sur Empanada bar https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/pedros-south-american-food-will-open-la-cocina-del-sur-empanada-bar/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 19:01:00 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/pedros-south-american-food-will-open-la-cocina-del-sur-empanada-bar/ There is a new restaurant on the docket for the old Riverwest gas station at 701 E. Keefe Ave. Pedro Tejada, owner of Pedro’s South American Food, will open La Cocina Del Sur Empanada Bar, a restaurant that will offer a wide variety of dishes from South American countries including Ecuador, Argentina, Colombia, Chile and […]]]>

There is a new restaurant on the docket for the old Riverwest gas station at 701 E. Keefe Ave.

Pedro Tejada, owner of Pedro’s South American Food, will open La Cocina Del Sur Empanada Bar, a restaurant that will offer a wide variety of dishes from South American countries including Ecuador, Argentina, Colombia, Chile and beyond.

“We’ve had great success with our food truck and our restaurant business has grown,” says Tejada. “But it’s a new adventure. It’s exciting to have the opportunity to serve people South American dishes that are not presented elsewhere. I am excited. There is so much more to share with the city.

Building owner Bryan Atinsky, who also operated the Riverwest gas station, says he couldn’t think of a better tenant for the restaurant.

“Pedro’s food is excellent,” he says. “It’s cooked from scratch and will be a great addition to the neighborhood.”

Although the timing of the restaurant’s opening is somewhat uncertain, largely due to a backlog of permit applications and multiple vacancies for alderman positions, Tejada says he hopes to open the restaurant in December 2022 or January 2023.

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Originally from Quito, Ecuador, Tejada says his interest in food was piqued during a five-month hiking expedition he embarked on when he was just 18 years old. After graduating from school, he traveled to various South American countries, sampling food from various street vendors.


When he moved to Milwaukee in 2005, he took on a variety of restaurant roles in the area. But in July 2015, he decided to go it alone. He launched his first food cart in July of that year, serving a menu of handmade Ecuadorian-style empanadas and tamales. Over time, it branched out to include other offerings, including Colombian-style arepas, a popular offering that prompted the launch of a second food cart in 2017. By 2019, it had acquired the funds needed to purchase a full-fledged food truck.

Around the same time, Tejada says, he began looking for a brick-and-mortar location. But when the pandemic hit in March 2020, he put those plans on hold, opting instead to continue serving food from his truck and offering catering services.

So when the opportunity arose to take over the space from Riverwest, Tejada says he was thrilled to take over a space that was in such great condition.

“We really like the look of the space,” he says. “Most of the walls are brick and there are so many windows. We also love the rustic wood and metal work.

Tejada says they don’t plan to make many changes to the restaurant, other than adding some basic décor to create an ambience suitable for the food they will be serving.

As for the menu, he says they will start by offering staples that they served in the food truck, including fried plantains, yucca fries, tacos, tamales, and ropa-filled empanadas. vieja, chicken picadillo and chicken mole.

Tejada will also be offering its popular handmade arepas stuffed with cheese, a choice of protein (pulled pork, mechado beef, chicken mojo or black beans) and topped with curtido salad, pickled red onions, cilantro and aioli. .


But Tejada says he will also take the opportunity to roll out new items, regularly offering restaurant specials and adding to the menu over time.

Pending approval of their liquor license, La Cocina Del Sur will also offer a full bar. Tejada says he hopes to offer a selection of South American wines and locally brewed beers, including selections like Third Space Brewing’s lager or pilsner, which are a perfect match for Tejada’s empanadas. Guests can also expect a small cocktail menu featuring classic South American drinks as well as a variety of spiked hot drinks for the winter months.

Tejada, who has lived in the Riverwest neighborhood for more than a decade, says it’s an honor to open a restaurant in the area.

“It’s a neighborhood where I got to know so many people,” he says. “And when we set up our truck here, people are always very grateful. So it was a great opportunity for us to continue to serve this community.

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Why Latin American Food Doesn’t Get Enough Credit https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/why-latin-american-food-doesnt-get-enough-credit/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/why-latin-american-food-doesnt-get-enough-credit/ On food In August, I wrote about how I wouldn’t be touting the Mediterranean diet as much as I used to. One reason is that the emphasis on this one way of eating – delicious and nutritious as it is – is dismissive of other traditional ways of eating that are too delicious and nutritious, […]]]>

On food

In August, I wrote about how I wouldn’t be touting the Mediterranean diet as much as I used to. One reason is that the emphasis on this one way of eating – delicious and nutritious as it is – is dismissive of other traditional ways of eating that are too delicious and nutritious, but which have not benefited from the research spotlight shone upon them. Take the example of Latin American cuisine.

Just like “the Mediterranean”, “Latin America” is not a monolith. It’s quite diverse, made up of Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean islands and South America – the countries that were affected by Spanish or Portuguese colonization centuries ago. While there are commonalities, the cuisines of this part of the world can be strongly regional, reflecting the blend of influences from indigenous peoples, their colonizers, and enslaved Africans. In her phenomenal cookbook, “The South American Table,” food writer, cooking teacher, and culinary historian Maria Baez Kijac calls South American cuisine, “a unique cuisine that I believe is unmatched anywhere in the world.” .

Unfortunately, I’ve observed a common misconception among non-Latinos that Latin American cuisine is less than healthy – too high in carbs and fats and too low in vegetables. Ironic, because I’ve also seen the food/wellness culture co-opt and select certain traditional Latin American foods as “superfoods” – avocados, chia seeds, quinoa, coconut milk, cashews , oat milk – while demonizing other traditional foods, namely corn, white rice and potatoes. It doesn’t matter that corn is a whole grain, potatoes pack a lot of nutrients, and a cup of brown rice only has one gram more fiber than white rice.

It’s easy to get an idea of ​​a culture’s cuisine from what we see on restaurant menus (including fast food menus), even though it doesn’t usually reflect what people from that culture eat and cook at home on average. For example, soups (sopas) and stews (caldos) are important in Latin American cuisine, but most Latin American restaurants don’t offer them.

In the United States, we are often accustomed to meals containing separate sources of protein and vegetables, such as grilled chicken with broccoli. With Latin American cuisine, mixed dishes are more common and vegetables are used both as a flavor base and as garnishes, so it may not be obvious how many vegetables you are eating. Beans, soups and stews can be cooked with sofrito – most versions start with onion and/or garlic, then add other ingredients such as tomatoes and peppers – then top with fresh salsas or raw vegetable toppings like shredded cabbage, radish, carrots or onion. Sauces, another important element of Latin American cuisine, are often also based on aromatic vegetables. There may also be a serving of pickled, fermented or grilled vegetables on the side.

When I first visited Buenos Aires, Argentina nearly 14 years ago, I had a mini-panic when few restaurant menus offered salads like the ones I had ordered at home. But the grilled vegetables were plentiful. (As I learned from the award-winning James Beard cookbook by Maricel E. Presilla, “Great Latina Kitchen“Latin American salads do exist – they just aren’t the leafy green concoctions I was used to.) When I visited Ecuador a decade later, I was much colder about the food.

We can learn a lot from Latin American cuisine, including how to use vegetables for flavor and how to incorporate more beans – a great source of protein, fiber and other nutrients. Like any food culture, Latin American food culture has nutritious and delicious food and is worth celebrating.

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My struggle with American food culture – The Orion https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/my-struggle-with-american-food-culture-the-orion/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 02:33:51 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/my-struggle-with-american-food-culture-the-orion/ A cheeseburger and fries from IN-N-OUT BURGER. Photo by Hiroto Nakajima, taken on September 3 A month has passed since I first arrived at Chico State from my home in Japan. At first, I wondered if I would have a good relationship with the environment at Chico. Luckily, I started adjusting to the American lifestyle […]]]>

A cheeseburger and fries from IN-N-OUT BURGER. Photo by Hiroto Nakajima, taken on September 3

A month has passed since I first arrived at Chico State from my home in Japan. At first, I wondered if I would have a good relationship with the environment at Chico. Luckily, I started adjusting to the American lifestyle with the help of my roommates. However, I still struggle with American food culture, especially fast food.

“Fast food is part of the American diet and has been linked to high calorie intake and poor quality diets,” according to a report by centers for disease control and prevention.

I wonder how to adapt to the large number of easily accessible fast food options. How to regularly eat healthy foods?

Fast food outlets are popular for saving money and time. According IBIS World datathe number of fast food restaurants in the United States has increased, despite the influence of COVID-19 on the fast food industry in 2020. In fact, I have seen fast food restaurants and food products fast everywhere since I arrived in the United States.

Fast food is readily available at Chico State, not only in the campus dining hall, but also at select nearby establishments. I often use the dining room and the market for lunch and dinner. I regularly eat fast food like burgers and pizza. In fact, I eat so much pizza that one of my friends calls me “the pizzaiolo”. I surely know that these foods are high in calories and not good for my health. However, I feel like it may be easier to look away.

When I was in Japan, my diet was completely different. I cooked Japanese cuisines to save money and because they are good for your health. That’s not the case here. I’m only staying in America for a year, so I don’t care as much about what I eat. Here, it seems that everyone eats fast food often and I feel like I’m starting to forget about the healthy lifestyle I practiced in Japan. Some people may think it’s okay to eat fast food regularly because everyone around them does it. Americans are used to eating fast food in the United States. According data found by the CDC in 2018 compared to fast food consumption from 2013 to 2016, 36.6% of adults in the United States consume fast food on any given day.

This number is even higher for young adults between the ages of 20 and 39, as 44.9% consume some kind of fast food every day. He wrote that fast food restaurants can save consumers money and time that would typically be spent cooking. In addition, the CDC says the obesity rate is a serious problem in the United States. The prevalence of obesity increased from 30.5% to 41.9% between 1999 and 2017. The CDC also warns that obesity is linked to conditions such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes type 2 and some types of cancer.

In my home country, there are also many fast food outlets and restaurants. In my experience, I have found that many Japanese students are more likely to cook for themselves at home than American students. Of course, some Japanese students are eager to eat fast foods like Cup-o-noodles or burgers to save time. However, most of them cook Japanese cuisines like Nikujaga and Miso soup. It saves us money because cooking is cheaper than eating out in Japan.

Considering all of this, I understand why I was so surprised by the different culture of fast food in the United States.

I think it’s important to think about how to approach fast food culture here. Fast food is essential to American food culture, but these products are often high in sugars and calories and can threaten our health.

Unlike my home country, the United States has more expensive food but meal preparation takes just as much time. The problem is whether we prioritize time and money or our health.

Personally, I think eating healthy foods is more important for your well-being than prioritizing money or time. By eating nutritious meals regularly, you will protect yourself from future illnesses and health problems. There are so many healthy options that are often overlooked, with many products you can cook and eat for relatively little money.

I think it’s a good idea to try healthy foods from other countries. By exploring healthy meals from around the world, you can learn about their unique cultures.

An example is a meal from my home country’s cuisine, “Nikujaga”, something Americans might call a meat and potato stew. If you are interested, you should try my homemade recipe.

For now, fast food is popular not only in the United States, but also around the world. There are many fast food restaurants in Chico State, but eating too much fast food has been proven to cause health problems. We should rethink our relationship with fast food culture and remember to eat healthy foods in our daily lives.

Hiroto Nakajima can be reached at [email protected] or @hiroto_nakajima_1120 on Instagram.

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CMX and Captain D’s to Present at North American Food Safety and Quality Conference 2022 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/cmx-and-captain-ds-to-present-at-north-american-food-safety-and-quality-conference-2022/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 12:04:30 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/cmx-and-captain-ds-to-present-at-north-american-food-safety-and-quality-conference-2022/ “Under Mark’s experienced leadership, Captain D’s has remained true to its commitment to providing premium quality seafood and fish from the best sources, using technology and automation as a lever, scale and consistent quality.” — Keith Cole, Vice President of CMX at Sales and Business Development CHICAGO (PRWEB) September 20, 2022 CMXa leading provider […]]]>

“Under Mark’s experienced leadership, Captain D’s has remained true to its commitment to providing premium quality seafood and fish from the best sources, using technology and automation as a lever, scale and consistent quality.” — Keith Cole, Vice President of CMX at Sales and Business Development

CMXa leading provider of cloud-based enterprise quality and risk management (EQMS) software, today announced that it will partner with Captain Dthe nation’s leading fast-casual seafood restaurant brand and a key CMX customer, to be showcased at the 2022 North American Food Safety and Quality Conference (NAFS22), September 27 and 28, 2022.

Captain D’s Vice President of Quality Assurance, Mark Earnest, will be joined by CMX’s Vice President of Sales and Business Development, Keith Cole, to deliver the presentation entitled “Creating a Culture of Quality and food safety throughout your supply chain”. It will take place on September 27 at 11:40 a.m. in room 2 of the Westin Chicago North Shore.

“Under Mark’s experienced leadership, Captain D’s has remained true to its commitment to providing premium quality seafood and fish from the best sources, using technology and automation as a lever, scale and consistent quality,” said Cole. “I look forward to teaming up with him to discuss how they have transformed their quality and food safety programs by leveraging automation, setting clear expectations and improving collaboration with their channel partners. procurement using the CMX1 platform.”

Based in Nashville, Tennessee, Captain D’s has more than 540 restaurants in 23 states. It was named the #1 seafood chain in QSR 50, ranked by AUV. Founded in 1969, Captain D’s has been offering customers high quality seafood at reasonable prices in a cozy atmosphere for over 53 years.

Earnest has worked in the food safety industry for over 30 years and, in addition to Captain D’s, has held positions with the United States Department of Agriculture, Nashville Davidson County Health Department, and other organizations. He joined Captain D’s in 2012.

The session will cover:

  • An overview of Captain D’s, its quality and safety programs and its global supply chain strategy
  • Captain D’s journey to automating supplier onboarding, training, certification and ongoing quality control
  • How Captain D’s Embraced Digital Transformation for Product Lifecycle Management, Product Reviews, Incidents, and Recall Management
  • ROI and the impact of digital on the company
  • Future plans for digital transformation

For those unable to attend the workshop, CMX will be sharing updates and takeaways on its social channels and Blog during and after the event.

Taking place September 27-28 in the Chicago area, NAFS brings together the “who’s who” of food safety, quality and compliance leaders from around the world. CMX is a sponsor of the 2022 event. To register for the conference, go to here.

About CMX

Leading brands such as Burger King, Outback, Arby’s, Captain D’s, Taco Bell, Pizza Hut, Sonic Drive-In, Raley’s Supermarkets and Hasbro rely on CMX1 Enterprise Quality and Risk Management Software (EQMS) based on the CMX cloud to help them achieve and maintain Operational Excellence and Quality. For over a decade, CMX has led the market with the most comprehensive and user-friendly cloud-based EQMS platform for food and consumer brands. It is the only enterprise solution to effectively combine supply chain quality and operational excellence in a single, fully configurable operating platform. For more information, please visit http://www.cmx1.com or call 1-858-866-8888.

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Buy American Food Act aims to support California agriculture https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/buy-american-food-act-aims-to-support-california-agriculture/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 12:30:00 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/buy-american-food-act-aims-to-support-california-agriculture/ Ed Andrieski ASSOCIATED PRESS A bill on Gov. Gavin Newsom’s desk could force California public institutions — including schools — to buy food produced in the United States, as long as it doesn’t cost 25% more than imported produce. Senate Bill 490, the Shop US Food Actaims to support domestic food production by creating competition […]]]>

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Ed Andrieski

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A bill on Gov. Gavin Newsom’s desk could force California public institutions — including schools — to buy food produced in the United States, as long as it doesn’t cost 25% more than imported produce.

Senate Bill 490, the Shop US Food Actaims to support domestic food production by creating competition among American businesses and providing local meals to students, according to the bill’s author, Senator Anna Caballero.

Caballero said the measure prioritizes domestic products over cheaper imported products. The legislation is necessary, she said, because California has some of the most stringent food safety and climate standards requirements, and state wage and benefits regulations increase the costs of workforce.

“I think if you’re buying American, you’re going to be buying almost exclusively from California across all (product) categories,” Caballero, a Democrat who represents the Salinas Valley and parts of the San Joaquin Valley, said during the interview. ‘a press conference. Wednesday morning at Sun-Maid Growers of California headquarters.

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California State Senator Anna Caballero speaks during a press conference in support of the Buy American Food Act on September 14, 2022 at the Sun-Maid Growers of California headquarters in Fresno. She is the lead author of the legislation (SB 490) and was part of the joint effort with farmers and farmworkers where they called on Governor Gavin Newsom to sign the bill into law. LAURA S.DIAZ ldiaz@fresnobee.com

If signed, the bill’s provisions would be enforced through an “honor system”, according to Caballero spokeswoman Elisa Rivera.

This is Caballero’s second attempt to have such a bill signed into California law. His previous bill sought to implement a similar protocol. He stalled in the legislature in June.

Previous and current measures have strong support from California farm organizations. Both bills are opposed by educational organizations, who say the Buy American Food Act would drive up their food prices.

“There are better ways to subsidize our agriculture industry than self-imposed price hikes in California schools,” said Troy Flint, spokesman for the California School Boards Association. “This bill is actually a transfer of funds from public education to the agricultural industry.”


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Some California farm groups support the bill

Some agriculture industry organizations support the bill, saying it could help stabilize and grow California’s agriculture industry after the challenges it faced during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I truly believe that policies like the one introduced by Senator Anna Caballero are needed today to protect workers deemed essential,” said Hernan Hernandez, executive director of the California Farmworker Foundation.

By pushing state institutions to buy domestic rather than imported food, the bill would support California producers who are struggling to compete with farms in other countries, said Rich Hudgins, president and CEO of the direction of the California Canning Peach Association.

“One of the biggest threats facing California peach growers today is the increasing volume of canned peaches of foreign origin entering the United States, primarily from China and Greece,” Hudgins said. .

“What’s devastating to farmers is that some of these foreign peaches were purchased with taxpayers’ money and are being served to our students through school feeding programs in California,” he said. he adds.

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A press conference attendee takes a photo of Teamsters 431 members standing next to Ashley Alvarado, President of Teamsters Local 856, in support of the Buy American Food Act on September 14, 2022 at Sun-Maid headquarters Growers of California in Fresno. LAURA S.DIAZ ldiaz@fresnobee.com

School association says bill would increase food costs

But the California School Boards Associationwho represents elected officials who govern public school districts and county education offices, says the legislation would strain school district lunch budgets and jeopardize state efforts to provide universal school lunches to schoolchildren .

The association said the Buy American Food Act would increase the cost of purchasing school lunches by up to 25%. He said the Buy American Food Act would cost districts an additional $474 million or $85 per student, based on calculations by the California County Superintendents Educational Services Association.

Caballero acknowledged that the Buy American Food Act will indeed cost school districts more. She said the state has allocated $611.8 million to help school districts with this additional cost.

“This higher reimbursement rate will allow local educational organizations to continue to offer better quality and diversified meals to our students and to ensure the Universal Meal Program continues uninterrupted,” Caballero said.

However, Flint with the CSBA said the association fought for the $611.8 million to cover the already escalating prices schools face to comply with the Universal Meals program, not Caballero’s bill. .

“Because California is now serving meals to all students, school districts are hiring more nutrition program staff and converting part-time staff to full-time, resulting in significant additional costs in terms of salaries and expenses. benefits,” Flint said.

“That’s what the $611.8 million is intended to pay for, so it’s misleading to suggest that this money was intended to pay for a law that arbitrarily suggests schools raise the prices of goods,” a- he added.

Newsom has until the end of the month to sign or veto the legislation.

Follow more of our stories on Central Valley News Collaborative

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New book “Masa” reveals the secret of Central American cuisine https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/new-book-masa-reveals-the-secret-of-central-american-cuisine-2/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 16:05:28 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/new-book-masa-reveals-the-secret-of-central-american-cuisine-2/ Martinez, a Texan, invented a product that is the basis of the way we eat tacos and many other mexicans and Central American foods today: masa harina, a type of corn flour. Masa – a paste made from ground corn that has been mixed in an alkaline solution, or “nixtamalized” – has been used for […]]]>

Martinez, a Texan, invented a product that is the basis of the way we eat tacos and many other mexicans and Central American foods today: masa harina, a type of corn flour. Masa – a paste made from ground corn that has been mixed in an alkaline solution, or “nixtamalized” – has been used for thousands of years in Mesoamerica. It is the basis of countless specialties, whether tortillas or tamales, gorditas or pupusas.

Masa is a labor-intensive process, which is why Martinez was so important. Born in Mexico, he opened the first fresh masa mill in the United States in 1896 in San Antonio, but he noticed that his paste was drying out quickly. Martinez developed a recipe for a dehydrated version of masa that had a longer shelf life. Add a little water to the masa harina and you have a tortilla in minutes, versus 12 hours.

“He really helped lay the foundation for masa as we know it today,” says Gaviria. “Unwittingly, he became the pioneer of this first-wave masa movement, which ushered in this era of convenience.”

Making tortillas starts with masa, the subject of a new book by Jorge Gaviria.

Graydon Herriott

Martinez’s contributions to food culture didn’t stop there. A “hard-working entrepreneur,” says Gaviria, he salvaged surplus masa from his factory every day and turned them into triangular fries, which he sold to restaurateurs who served them with salsa or guacamole. Sound familiar?

Today, we’re more likely to know about Frito-Lay, whose founder was a former client of Martinez, or Maseca, the company that started more than 20 years after Martinez’s death and is now essentially synonymous with masa harina. Martinez, Gaviria writes in his book, has been relegated to “relative obscurity in mainstream masa history.”

While his story is a satisfying aside fueling Texas bragging rights, it’s only a small part of “Masa.” Published September 13 by Chronicle Books, the 240-page tome is part history lesson, part reference book, part cookbook, a celebration of masa in all its forms, with beautiful photography by Graydon Herriott . It guides the reader through the ancestral roots of masa, its evolution in three “waves” and the science behind the nixtamalization process, followed by step-by-step recipes for creating just about any variation you can think of, from memelas to tlayudas.

Mexican farmer Filemón Maya Jiménez is one of the suppliers of Masienda, an American company founded by Jorge Gaviria.

Mexican farmer Filemón Maya Jiménez is one of the suppliers of Masienda, an American company founded by Jorge Gaviria.

Noah Forbes

“Masa” is a natural extension of Masienda, the company Gaviria founded in 2014. While working in farm-to-table restaurants in New York, he aspired to bring the same kind of connection between staple foods that he grew up eating, their places of origin and his farmers. Masa felt like a good place to start, because it’s “a connective tissue all over Latin America,” he says. Gaviria has built supply chains from the ground up with heritage corn producers in Oaxaca, selling corn in bulk to restaurants, as well as masa harina and other related food products and accessories to consumers.

“When I started Masienda, my very naive idea was that I wanted to put Gruma out of business, stick to the man,” Gaviria says of the parent company of Maseca, the biggest maize flour maker. in the world. He has since understood the importance of large-scale food production for everyday cooks, he adds, but he sees Masienda as an addition to what exists, when there was not that. option in the United States before.

“But there’s no judgment on what you end up using,” Gaviria says. “The 50 recipes are designed with masa harina in mind because we know most cooks will probably start with this.”

Jorge Gaviria wrote "massah" after struggling to find resources when setting up his business, Masienda.

Jorge Gaviria wrote “Masa” after difficulties in finding resources when establishing his company, Masienda.

Graydon Herriott

When creating Masienda, Gaviria says it was difficult to find a solid resource with detailed information on the subject of masa, a product that has been around for thousands of years. If he were to build a supply chain for it in the United States, he would have to educate people on what it is and how to use it. In 2017, his team created a 50-page introductory booklet, which was a hit. He knew the appetite for a full book was there.

“Masa” is indeed a sturdy primer and a useful guide to dipping your hands into the dough yourself. Each corn specialty has its own page with context such as country or region of origin; whether it’s a topper, a stuffer or both; detailed instructions on how to shape it; and even storage tips for leftovers. This section is followed by more specific recipes from renowned chefs such as Daniela Soto-Innes, Alex Stupak and Enrique Olvera.

To replicate the recipes with Masienda products, Houstonians can order them online or pick them up at Henderson & Kane in the fourth ward. But they can also have eaten Masienda without even knowing it: The Chiefs of TatemoPapalo Mercado, Degust and El Big Bad all source corn from the company for their feed.

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New book “Masa” reveals the secret of Central American cuisine https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/new-book-masa-reveals-the-secret-of-central-american-cuisine/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 15:36:34 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/new-book-masa-reveals-the-secret-of-central-american-cuisine/ Martinez, a Texan, invented a product that is the basis of how we eat tacos and many other Mexican and Central American foods today: masa harina, a type of cornmeal. Masa – a paste made from ground corn that has been mixed in an alkaline solution, or “nixtamalized” – has been used for thousands of […]]]>

Martinez, a Texan, invented a product that is the basis of how we eat tacos and many other Mexican and Central American foods today: masa harina, a type of cornmeal. Masa – a paste made from ground corn that has been mixed in an alkaline solution, or “nixtamalized” – has been used for thousands of years in Mesoamerica. It is the basis of countless specialties, whether tortillas or tamales, gorditas or pupusas.

Masa is a labor-intensive process, which is why Martinez was so important. Born in Mexico, he opened the first fresh masa mill in the United States in 1896 in San Antonio, but he noticed that his paste was drying out quickly. Martinez developed a recipe for a dehydrated version of masa that had a longer shelf life. Add a little water to the masa harina and you have a tortilla in minutes, versus 12 hours.

“He really helped lay the foundation for masa as we know it today,” says Gaviria. “Unwittingly, he became the pioneer of this first-wave masa movement, which ushered in this era of convenience.”

Making tortillas starts with masa, the subject of a new book by Jorge Gaviria.

Graydon Herriott

Martinez’s contributions to food culture didn’t stop there. A “hard-working entrepreneur,” says Gaviria, he salvaged surplus masa from his factory every day and turned them into triangular fries, which he sold to restaurateurs who served them with salsa or guacamole. Sound familiar?

Today, we’re more likely to know about Frito-Lay, whose founder was a former client of Martinez, or Maseca, the company that started more than 20 years after Martinez’s death and is now essentially synonymous with masa harina. Martinez, Gaviria writes in his book, has been relegated to “relative obscurity in mainstream masa history.”

While his story is a satisfying aside fueling Texas bragging rights, it’s only a small part of “Masa.” Published September 13 by Chronicle Books, the 240-page tome is part history lesson, part reference book, part cookbook, a celebration of masa in all its forms, with beautiful photography by Graydon Herriott . It guides the reader through the ancestral roots of masa, its evolution in three “waves” and the science behind the nixtamalization process, followed by step-by-step recipes for creating just about any variation you can think of, from memelas to tlayudas.

Mexican farmer Filemón Maya Jiménez is one of the suppliers of Masienda, an American company founded by Jorge Gaviria.

Mexican farmer Filemón Maya Jiménez is one of the suppliers of Masienda, an American company founded by Jorge Gaviria.

Noah Forbes

“Masa” is a natural extension of Masienda, the company Gaviria founded in 2014. While working in farm-to-table restaurants in New York, he aspired to bring the same kind of connection between staple foods that he grew up eating, their places of origin and his farmers. Masa felt like a good place to start, because it’s “a connective tissue all over Latin America,” he says. Gaviria has built supply chains from the ground up with heritage corn producers in Oaxaca, selling corn in bulk to restaurants, as well as masa harina and other related food products and accessories to consumers.

“When I started Masienda, my very naive idea was that I wanted to put Gruma out of business, stick to the man,” Gaviria says of the parent company of Maseca, the biggest maize flour maker. in the world. He has since understood the importance of large-scale food production for everyday cooks, he adds, but he sees Masienda as an addition to what exists, when there was not that. option in the United States before.

“But there’s no judgment on what you end up using,” Gaviria says. “The 50 recipes are designed with masa harina in mind because we know most cooks will probably start with this.”

Jorge Gaviria wrote "massah" after struggling to find resources when setting up his business, Masienda.

Jorge Gaviria wrote “Masa” after difficulties in finding resources when establishing his company, Masienda.

Graydon Herriott

When creating Masienda, Gaviria says it was difficult to find a solid resource with detailed information on the subject of masa, a product that has been around for thousands of years. If he were to build a supply chain for it in the United States, he would have to educate people on what it is and how to use it. In 2017, his team created a 50-page introductory booklet, which was a hit. He knew the appetite for a full book was there.

“Masa” is indeed a sturdy primer and a useful guide to dipping your hands into the dough yourself. Each corn specialty has its own page with context such as country or region of origin; whether it’s a topper, a stuffer or both; detailed instructions on how to shape it; and even storage tips for leftovers. This section is followed by more specific recipes from renowned chefs such as Daniela Soto-Innes, Alex Stupak and Enrique Olvera.

To replicate the recipes with Masienda products, Houstonians can order them online or pick them up at Henderson & Kane in Fourth Ward. But they can also have eaten Masienda without even knowing it: The Chiefs of TatemoPapalo Mercado, Degust and El Big Bad all source corn from the company for their feed.



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Tino to Braunschweig | Latin American food and drink in Melbourne https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/tino-to-braunschweig-latin-american-food-and-drink-in-melbourne/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/tino-to-braunschweig-latin-american-food-and-drink-in-melbourne/ Taking on the bones of the former Brunswick Rascal wine bar, the cozy new neighborhood bar and restaurant Tino is on a mission to pay a delicious tribute to the culinary traditions of Latin America. But it’s far from traditional – and that’s exactly what Argentinian chef and co-owner Sergio Tourn wants. “Not only do […]]]>

Taking on the bones of the former Brunswick Rascal wine bar, the cozy new neighborhood bar and restaurant Tino is on a mission to pay a delicious tribute to the culinary traditions of Latin America. But it’s far from traditional – and that’s exactly what Argentinian chef and co-owner Sergio Tourn wants.

“Not only do we want to keep things interesting, [but we also] want the chance to experiment,” says Tourn, who plans to keep things fresh with offerings like rotating ceviche dishes and an empanada of the week, among other limited-edition dishes.

The a la carte menu is designed to be shared, and highlights include a smoky, savory and sweet version of beef tartare that includes avocado, morita and saline; taleggio-filled croquettes garnished with cranberry chamois; and roasted eggplant loaded with granola and swimming in red mole and crème fraîche. For a complete feast, punters can opt for a multi-course banquet of the chef’s choice.

If wine is your drink of choice, there are over 200 drops from Latin America and Australia to choose from. Beer lovers can choose from a concise list of Latin and local beers, including Quilmes and Negra Modelo, and those after cocktails can drink $15 Pisco Sours all day, every day.

After more to do while you’re in the area? Check out our local Brunswick guide.

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Why Pickle is Trending on the American Food Circuit – Health Benefits and More https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/why-pickle-is-trending-on-the-american-food-circuit-health-benefits-and-more/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 12:35:42 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/why-pickle-is-trending-on-the-american-food-circuit-health-benefits-and-more/ Culinary preferences are always changing, whether in India or beyond. We have wholeheartedly adopted Chinese, Italian and other cuisines like ours and the same trend is found elsewhere. The pickle originated in India and is the most popular accompaniment to Indian dishes. High-acid fermented fruits or vegetables with oils, lemon, vinegar or brine make delicious […]]]>

Culinary preferences are always changing, whether in India or beyond. We have wholeheartedly adopted Chinese, Italian and other cuisines like ours and the same trend is found elsewhere. The pickle originated in India and is the most popular accompaniment to Indian dishes. High-acid fermented fruits or vegetables with oils, lemon, vinegar or brine make delicious side dishes. Even a grain of the sour taste of pickled foods can overturn an indescribable meal. While we can never get enough of our desi aam ka achaar or nimbu ka achaar, people enjoy the same salty, sour, sweet, and bitter taste in olives, jalapenos, and capers. In fact, pickle flavored foods are the latest craze in America and people are looking for everything in this flavor.

Strange as it may seem, Americans enjoy everything pickled – from pickle burgers, pizza and falafel to pickle beer and even fries, dips and juices. The umami flavor that adds complexity and warmth to food is something we enjoyed a long time ago and now it is recognized around the world. What began as the practice of food preservation in ancient times has now become a culinary art.

(Also read: 11 Best Pickle Recipes | Easy Pickle Recipes)

Reason behind the growing popularity of pickled foods

For starters, the pickling process increases the shelf life of foods. This is the reason why the practice originally arose. Apart from this, pickling enhances the flavor profile of food which imbues a distinctive sour and sour taste. But these are not the only benefits we get from pickled foods. A research article published in the ‘Functional Foods Journal‘ states how pickles also impart a host of health benefits.

Health benefits of pickles:

  • Micro-organisms (mainly lactic acid bacteria as well as Micrococcaceae, bacilli, yeasts and filamentous fungi) play a key role in the pickling process. LAB microorganisms improve the probiotic properties of the final food, which improves intestinal health.
  • Pickled foods also restore the natural bioactive compounds and antioxidant capacities of fruits and vegetables, helping to boost the immune system.
  • Pickled items are said to have high levels of protein, vitamins, and dietary fiber.
  • Pickles prepared from colorful fruits and vegetables contain pigments such as anthocyanins, flavonoids and carotenoids which are effective in fighting free radicals in the body.
  • Improved digestion and reduced serum cholesterol levels have also been attributed to pickle consumption.
  • Consuming a considerable amount of pickle can relieve exercise-related muscle cramps.

Considering all the above benefits of having pickles, it’s no surprise that the pickle frenzy wave is hitting hard.

About Neha GroverThe love of reading awakened his writing instinct. Neha is guilty of having a deep fixation with anything caffeinated. When she’s not pouring her nest of thoughts onto the screen, you can catch her reading while sipping coffee.

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