American food – Were Cooking Restaurants USA http://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 18:13:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg American food – Were Cooking Restaurants USA http://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/ 32 32 Greek-American food blogger Mary Papadimos discusses all things vegan – Greek City Times https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/greek-american-food-blogger-mary-papadimos-discusses-all-things-vegan-greek-city-times/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 23:00:03 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/greek-american-food-blogger-mary-papadimos-discusses-all-things-vegan-greek-city-times/ Mary is a Greek-American food blogger who turned her passion for veganism into a lifestyle of its own. I had the chance to chat with Mary as she discusses all about her food philosophy. You can find Mary’s amazing vegan recipes and her vegan cookbook e-book on Instagram @upbeetandkaleingit. Mary, can you introduce yourself to […]]]>

Mary is a Greek-American food blogger who turned her passion for veganism into a lifestyle of its own. I had the chance to chat with Mary as she discusses all about her food philosophy.

You can find Mary’s amazing vegan recipes and her vegan cookbook e-book on Instagram @upbeetandkaleingit.

Mary, can you introduce yourself to the Greek City Times community? Tell us about you.

Hi all! My name is Mary Papadimos and I am a 29 year old Greek American food blogger living in Tampa, Florida. I am married to my wonderful husband, Alex, who is a second year general surgery resident.

My passion for veganism and blogging started over six years ago. I started my blog and my Instagram account during my second year of graduate school. What started out as a hobby quickly grew into a lifestyle and a brand in its own right when I started working with food and wellness companies.

My heart and soul was dedicated to developing recipes and sharing the foods and products I loved throughout my graduate studies.

Eventually I got a double JD / MBA in May 2020 and knew exactly what I wanted to do next: turn my business into a full time job instead of practicing law. This is exactly what I did and I haven’t looked back since, I love what I do every day. Developing recipes and sharing veganism with my amazing community brings me the greatest joy.

What is your food philosophy?

I believe a hundred percent in feeding your body as much healthy, plant-based foods as possible, but I also believe in balance. While my husband and I eat very healthy everyday, we still enjoy my desserts and indulge in whatever we want on occasion. I certainly don’t believe in depriving myself, but I feel better when I focus on consuming a majority of whole foods.

How did you get started eating a plant-based diet?

During my last year of college, I saw a documentary that showed the horrific conditions in which factory-farmed animals are raised. It really shook me deep inside and I was disgusted by the lack of humanity, the disgusting conditions and the horrible treatment these animals endured. It made me want to never eat meat again, or even fish! I first became a vegetarian, but then made the final transition to veganism during my graduate studies. While I think a vegan diet, when done right, is the healthiest, I am one hundred percent vegan to my animal friends. The voiceless need a voice and I’m here to speak up and show people how easy and amazing it is to be vegan.

What challenges have you encountered?

If I had a dime for the number of times people laughed at veganism, I would be a very rich woman. At first, when people judged me or made negative comments about going vegan, I took it too personally. Now, I don’t mind at all because I fully live my truth and am strong in my beliefs. I never found it difficult to eat vegan other than going out to restaurants, which I only did occasionally anyway. I have always liked to prepare 95% of my meals at home.

If you could give one piece of advice to new vegans, what would it be?

You are doing an amazing thing, so don’t be discouraged if you mess up along the way. Additionally, use as many resources as possible such as blogs, websites, books, and any relevant information to make your transition to veganism comfortable and well-balanced.

Marie papadimos

Why blog?

I blog because it’s not only my job, but also my passion. Reaching hundreds of thousands of great people around the world brings me so much happiness. Watching people prepare my recipes and tag me in posts is very rewarding, and the support from my upbeetandkaleingit community is unmatched. Working with food brands is amazing and I’m constantly looking to develop my cooking and baking skills. Most of my work doesn’t look like work to me because it’s so much fun.

What makes your website / profile different from all the others?

While there are tons of vegan blogs out there, mine is hard to beat in terms of ease and convenience. I want people to see how accessible veganism is and for me that means not complicating recipes. My brand encompasses an easy style of cooking and cooking with real ingredients. Life is incredibly busy these days, but preparing food shouldn’t be stressful, so it’s something I really focus on.

What’s your next one for you? Goals and dreams?

I plan to continue to develop my brand, upbeetandkaleingit. It means expanding my blog, Instagram and tiktok to reach more people. I would love to continue working with amazing food brands and eventually create my own line of vegan desserts. Having my own tangible product is the end goal for sure.

Marie papadimosBe sure to try some of Mary’s recipes. I have some and they taste divine !!

Good food.

To read also: Chanel Contos crowned among the “Women of the year” of Marie Claire in 2021



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Colorado Springs tastes Native American cuisine | Culture & Leisure https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/colorado-springs-tastes-native-american-cuisine-culture-leisure/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 14:14:26 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/colorado-springs-tastes-native-american-cuisine-culture-leisure/ Kelly Tohannie, owner of Adcloris & Sons, a Native American food company, was recently spotted at flea markets and other events around town with her food stall. Her tribe is Ho-Chunk, and her late husband’s tribe was Navajo. The name Adcloris is the combination of the first names of his three daughters: Adelyn, Lora and […]]]>

Kelly Tohannie, owner of Adcloris & Sons, a Native American food company, was recently spotted at flea markets and other events around town with her food stall. Her tribe is Ho-Chunk, and her late husband’s tribe was Navajo.

The name Adcloris is the combination of the first names of his three daughters: Adelyn, Lora and Lois. The sons are Tohannie’s son and a nephew, who is like his son.

The menu is small and offers five courses: fried bread ($ 4); NDN burger ($ 12), wajapi ($ 5), which is a berry compote; wajapi on fried bread ($ 9); and the highlight of the show, the Navajo taco ($ 13). The Navajo taco begins with a large disc of puffed deep fried bread topped with pinto and red kidney beans, ground beef, lettuce, tomato, and green chili or onion salsa, and drizzled with sour cream. It’s a guilty pleasure, that’s for sure. Visit facebook.com/AddysFrybread to find out where she will be on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays.

Colorado Springs couple bring creme de la creme to town

Friends day

The Melting Pot, 30 E. Pikes Peak Ave., is hosting Friendsgiving from November 22-24. Friendsgiving is a mixture of the words Friends and Thanksgiving. What better way to celebrate Turkey Day than to grab your BFFs for a drink and fondue? For $ 35 each, you get a three-course meal with choice of salad, fondue with teriyaki marinated sirloin, chicken breast, Pacific white shrimp, chicken sticks and mixed vegetables. The dessert is your choice of any chocolate fondue. Drink specials include $ 5 martinis and $ 6 glasses of wine. Reservations recommended. Details: 719-385-0300, tinyurl.com/58y3ve26.

The sweetness of the home

Lazy Dog Restaurant & Bar, 7605 N. Academy Blvd., offers its popular DYI Gingerbread House Kits with 100% of sales going to Habitat for Humanity. Pick up a kit at the restaurant or order it for take out or delivery until December 31. The cost is $ 6.95. Details: 719-445-5851, lazydogrestaurants.com.

Colorado Springs Café has rethought its concept and new chef

Get on the bus

The Local Motive party bus offers party rides for adults. The cost is $ 30 for each. Tickets on localmotiveevents.com.

• The Dive Bar Crawl, from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. on Saturdays, makes a first stop at a thrift store where you have 30 minutes to get dressed for the night. It has a Zoom call outfit theme. Think business in comfy pajama tops and bottoms. The crazier and dumber the better. Then hop back on the bus to stop at four dive bars for inexpensive drinks and music.

• Gobble Wobble Karaoke Crawl runs from 6:30 pm to 11:30 pm on November 26th. Visit four karaoke bars.

Choice of pike: the excellence of eggplant

Seafood solution

Jax Fish House & Oyster Bar, 11 S. Tejon St., is closed on Thanksgiving Day, but he’s there to help with vacation dinners. It offers special large-format dishes for eight to take out during the holiday season. Dishes include lobster mac and cheese, Louisiana crayfish okra, and steamed PEI mussel kits. Frozen raw bar platters, bottles of wine and large cocktails also available to take away. Visit jaxfishhouse.com/colorado-springs and click the take out button to order curbside pickup.

Downtown eats

Tejon Eatery, 19 N. Tejon St., has added two more concepts to the restaurant lineup: Fresh Twist, a juice and salad bar, and Bol, serving dumplings and bowls of ramen. The final concept remains to come, a sushi place. Hours of operation are 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Details: 719 653-3271, facebook.com/tejoneatery.

contact the editor: 636-0271.


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Taste Makers profiles immigrant female chefs in American culinary culture https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/taste-makers-profiles-immigrant-female-chefs-in-american-culinary-culture/ https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/taste-makers-profiles-immigrant-female-chefs-in-american-culinary-culture/#respond Tue, 09 Nov 2021 17:01:09 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/taste-makers-profiles-immigrant-female-chefs-in-american-culinary-culture/ Is there a particular dish that you cook when you feel most connected to Iran? NB: Fesenjun. It is native to northern Iran, where there are a lot of birds, although it is by the Caspian Sea. So they cook the duck with pomegranates and walnut sauce. But I’m from Tehran and I remember my […]]]>

Is there a particular dish that you cook when you feel most connected to Iran?

NB: Fesenjun. It is native to northern Iran, where there are a lot of birds, although it is by the Caspian Sea. So they cook the duck with pomegranates and walnut sauce. But I’m from Tehran and I remember my mom cooking turkey and sautéing it with salt, pepper, turmeric and saffron, of course. Each dish has saffron. Back then the sauce was made with a mortar and pestle, but now I make it in a food processor. And my mom used fresh squeezed pomegranate juice, which gives such a great flavor. You slowly cook the turkey all day, letting the meat fall off the bones. I keep the integrity and shape of the turkey, but the sauce infuses it. It is adorable.

How do you think people can relate to a culture through food?

MRS: So Najmieh is only one of the two surviving subjects in my book, the other being Julie Sahni. Even though I spent time with lots of memoirs, cookbooks, and interviews of these deceased characters, one guideline I detected is that the taste would reveal so many memories of a house they left behind. them. Food is one of the first ways so many immigrants to America first establish a sense of belonging in a new country.

This was certainly true when my mother arrived here from a village in West Bengal after having an arranged marriage with my late father. Just being an Indian in New Jersey in the early 1980s must have been unbelievably difficult. She worked so that I could live a comfortable life. Cooking was one of the ways she was able to establish a sense of coziness in an otherwise very disorienting time. This is true of all the women in this book and I hope the readers will see it.

NB: Identity is linked to culture rather than geographic location for immigrant communities. And they can define themselves through their food, their music and their culture. This reduces the pain of being away. Now people start to speak Persian from their childhood and it was not like that 40 years ago. So when you identify yourself through your culture or heritage, it can really help you as an immigrant family. And I think that by eating Indian food, your mother’s food, you are embracing your roots.

Were you able to cook and eat together during this process?

MRS: I came back to visit him in April 2019 and observed his cook. I don’t know what you know about it, but I’m not a skilled cook at all. One of the things I love about having Najmieh in the kitchen is that she made me feel very comfortable. I remember maybe it was onions on the stove or something, but I was just tumbling them on the heat so quick. And she just told me to take my time and, you know, be patient. And even that kind of little lesson taught me so much about how to be a cook.

NB: I know my job, I like to give people the means to cook. Being a cook as a woman was not very popular, don’t forget that. About 30 years ago I wrote my first cookbook Food of life. And people would meet us and say, “Najmieh, what are you doing? I would say, “I’m a cook. My mom was so upset. She said, “Don’t say you’re a cook, that’s insulting. And she said I should tell them I’m a writer. [Laughs] So even my mom didn’t like what I was doing because it was kind of scolded. Bless his heart. She’s not alive, but I think she’s over now. She would really appreciate Mayukh’s book.

I’m sure she would love this book and, Mayukh, your dad would love it too. It is very special. What do you hope readers take away from it?

MRS: I really appreciate it. I’m sure a lot of people would see the list in this book and say, “Oh wow. I’m so curious about how America has become this “melting pot” of different cuisines around the world. How come we can get saag paneer on one block, then enchiladas on the next, then double down on the next one? It’s very romantic to see America in these terms, as a wonderfully diverse culinary melting pot.

But I hope readers understand that there are so many struggles embedded in this reality that consumers are now taking advantage. Najmieh’s story is a powerful example of how much people had to struggle to make this reality possible. He is someone who had to fight very, very hard in a difficult time in America for the Iranians. She, despite her credentials, was unable to sell her own cookbook to a major publisher. And so she had to become very self-sufficient with the help of her husband, Mohammad. Together, they pursued this path so independent of these powerful institutions. Najmieh became a pioneer and she ultimately triumphed. But it was not easy.

NB: My point of view is to follow your passion and not worry about what other people think. People will notice what you have done eventually. English is not my language, I have dyslexia, I’m a Muslim, I’m a woman, all of those things, but I got it right. So I think it can be a good example for other women. They can do it too.

I taught homeless women in Washington how to cook for a few years and wanted to teach them sweet carrot rice flavored with orange blossom. But the program director said they won’t know what orange blossom is and won’t include it. But I did it anyway. A woman came to see me afterwards, kissed my hand, and told me that she wanted to cook and write books someday. This experience touched me with love. You can make an impact if you stay true to yourself.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.


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TikTok can’t believe this German ad about American food insecurity https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/tiktok-cant-believe-this-german-ad-about-american-food-insecurity/ https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/tiktok-cant-believe-this-german-ad-about-american-food-insecurity/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 18:49:00 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/tiktok-cant-believe-this-german-ad-about-american-food-insecurity/ A commentator on Morcho’s TikTok noted that “much of our ‘food’ is considered deadly chemicals in other countries.” Another said that “most European countries consider America a third world country because of poverty and lack of proper health care.” Others shared their personal experiences with food insecurity. It’s unclear if the ad was meant to […]]]>

A commentator on Morcho’s TikTok noted that “much of our ‘food’ is considered deadly chemicals in other countries.” Another said that “most European countries consider America a third world country because of poverty and lack of proper health care.” Others shared their personal experiences with food insecurity. It’s unclear if the ad was meant to be satire, as some commentators have claimed, but many viewers still seemed to see the reality behind the video.

A takeaway from the ad is that millions of Americans struggle to eat. While the clip indicates that 49 million Americans are food insecure, a USDA statistic indicates that more than 38 million people lived in food insecure households in 2020. Additionally, a 2017 report from the ‘USDA reports that 19 million Americans live with limited access. in a supermarket or grocery store in areas often referred to as food deserts. For many of these consumers, the closest food options are found in convenience stores or fast food outlets. While the ad was aimed at German viewers, it seemed to be eye-opening for Americans as well, to say the least.


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From American cuisine with French accents to a Mediterranean bistro – Marin Independent Journal https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/from-american-cuisine-with-french-accents-to-a-mediterranean-bistro-marin-independent-journal/ https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/from-american-cuisine-with-french-accents-to-a-mediterranean-bistro-marin-independent-journal/#respond Tue, 02 Nov 2021 18:59:36 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/from-american-cuisine-with-french-accents-to-a-mediterranean-bistro-marin-independent-journal/ The owners of Fast Food Français (F3) Susannah and Olivier Souvestre needed a change. Last week, after closing their Sausalito restaurant for a month to renovate the interior and menu, they reopened as Zalta, a Mediterranean bistro. Les Souvestres have been in the restaurant business of Le Marin for some time, opening Le Garage in […]]]>

The owners of Fast Food Français (F3) Susannah and Olivier Souvestre needed a change. Last week, after closing their Sausalito restaurant for a month to renovate the interior and menu, they reopened as Zalta, a Mediterranean bistro.

Les Souvestres have been in the restaurant business of Le Marin for some time, opening Le Garage in Sausalito in 2008 with partner Bruno Denis (they then sold their share). The Appart Resto in San Anselmo, now closed, followed in 2010, then F3 in 2013.

At Zalta, Chef Souvestre, of French origin, presents a menu totally different from American cuisine with a French touch that he has been doing for 11 years at F3.

“We felt like we needed a refresh and new energy,” says Susannah Souvestre, who cited the pandemic as a motivator to embark on something new. “Mediterranean cuisine is what we cook at home, and it helps that there are very few restaurants in Marin.”

The menu includes appetizers such as bites of ahi tuna on Greek kataifi with olive tapenade; lamb chops with hot green pepper sauce; and a plate of mezze made with Moroccan pickled vegetables, dolma, olives, feta cheese and a set of Middle Eastern dips with pita.

The hand-pressed dough made from wheat, rice and soy flour serves as the base for Pinsa Romana, an airy oval-shaped pizza with toppings like lamb merguez, pepperoncini, feta, pine nuts and green garlic tahini sauce; porchetta, crème fraîche, fontina; and roasted tomatoes and pepper shakshuka crowned with an egg.

You can still get a burger, but this one has layers of tzatziki, pickled onions, cucumbers, tomatoes, and green zhug between a panoramic focaccia bun. Four Mediterranean-style protein dishes complete the menu.

While the interior structure remains the same, it has been reinvented with fresh paint, braided grass lighting, aqua blue mosaic tiles, and Moroccan accents.

A wall of shelves behind the bar is illuminated with backlighting and displays a vibrant collection of cocktail mixes. Naturally, it includes a selection from the owner’s new, Novato-based distillery, Alamere Spirits, winner of a few recent spirits competition prizes.

Try it in house Pomegroni with pomegranate, Lillet, Alamere London Dry gin and Angostura bitters, or Zalta G&T with Alamere makrut lime and lemongrass gin, Mediterranean tonic, juniper berries and fresh mint. Alamere Spirits can also be found at Nugget Markets in Novato, Andy’s Local Market in San Rafael, Woodlands Market in Tiburon, Vintage Wines and Spirits in Mill Valley, Drivers Market in Sausalito, and Bungalow 44 local restaurants. , Picco and the Trident.

A new wine list features lesser-known grape varieties from Greece, Lebanon, Portugal, France and Italy, as well as California.

Zalta is open from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Wednesdays and Thursdays; 4 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. on Fridays; from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. and from 4 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. on Saturday; and 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Sundays and is closed Mondays and Tuesdays at 39 Caledonia Street. For more information or to book, visit zalta.us.

Tonic tincture

St Hildie’s Spiked Tint Tonics hit local market shelves just in time for the holiday season. The herbal canned cocktails are made in Mill Valley by a trio of founders dedicated to wellness – Meghan DeRoma, Alexi Cashen and Mill Valley CEO and resident Christine Peck.

Women entrepreneurs are committed to finding their way into the male-dominated beverage industry by creating what they call a “ready-to-drink functional cocktail designed for the wellness-conscious drinker.”

Courtesy of St Hildie’s Spiked Tincture Tonics

St Hildie’s spiked dye tonics, made in Mill Valley, have appeared throughout Marin.

These sparkling drinks are light on alcohol and calories and have a touch of sparkling, real fruit juices and herbal adaptogenic and nootropic tinctures that help support the mind, body and spirit. These come in three exclusive flavors: ginger guava, elderberry hibiscus and lemon turmeric.

“It was important for us to create a drink that allows us to enjoy the pleasures of soaking up while maintaining a healthy lifestyle,” they share via a spokesperson.

St. Hildie’s can be found in Marin’s markets and restaurants including Junction, Farmshop, Mill Valley Market, Driver’s Market, Andy’s Market, and Jolly King Liquors, as well as other California retailers. Learn more at drinkahildie.com.

Culinary camps

Scott Davis aka the Culinary Dude is giving parents a double win over the next few weeks of school vacations – three to five day options to get a break from the day and an opportunity for kids to learn a plethora of dishes to expand the family recipe directory.

Three interactive and individualized culinary camps lasting several days are planned from November 22 to 24, from December 20 to 24 and from December 27 to 31 in Tiburon, from $ 300 to $ 495.

Photo by Scott Davis

Scott Davis, aka the Culinary Dude, teaches kids how to cook in upcoming camps.

Davis’s mission is to empower students aged 6 to 14 to find their inner chef by teaching culinary skills, cooking etiquette and table manners. Campers follow up to six recipes a day and prepare menus made from fresh ingredients. All camps include a lunch prepared by the children with a main course and a side dish, a vegetable or fruit dish and a dessert.

Some of the highlights of Thanksgiving week camp include creamy baked corn, bean and greens gratin, roasted cauliflower with smoked paprika, sweet potato and cranberry salad, cakes of crab and seafood and a fried turkey ($ 300).

In the first of the December camps, children prepare and enjoy traditional Christmas, Hanukkah and Kwanzaa dishes, including turkey and Creole seafood; Galette with potatoes; soda bread; eggplant parmesan; chicken shawarma; simmered shoulder of lamb; chicken with Doro Wat spices; green cabbage; creamed spinach; honey glazed ham; Parker House buns; snickerdoodle brownies; sweet lokshen kugel; and bananas promote crispness. ($ 495)

The last camp of the year focuses on Christmas favorites from around the world. Kids will head south of the border to sample pickled Mexican vegetables, chicken pozole, salsa fresca, Mexican hot chocolate, and chocolate cookies. They will visit the islands on day two for Hawaiian Pulled Pork Sliders with Tropical Coleslaw; chocolate haupia pie; and anti-spam fries. Vegan, Canadian and international days follow with foods that match the theme. All camps follow strict national and local COVID security protocols and are conducted in a nut-free environment.

Camps are held from 10 am to 2 pm at St. Hilary School at 765 Hilary Drive in Tiburon. Early deposit and late pickup are available at an additional cost. Check out details, daily menus and registration information at theculinarydude.com or call 415-242-4192. Registration is limited to 16 campers.

Leanne Battelle is a freelance food writer and food columnist. Please email her at ij.lbattelle@gmail.com with news and recommendations and follow her on Instagram @therealdealmarin for more on local cuisine and updates on the launch of The Real Restaurant Guide Deal Marin.


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‘Mother of American Cuisine’ Alice Waters celebrates the 50th anniversary of Californian restaurant Chez Panisse https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/mother-of-american-cuisine-alice-waters-celebrates-the-50th-anniversary-of-californian-restaurant-chez-panisse-2/ https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/mother-of-american-cuisine-alice-waters-celebrates-the-50th-anniversary-of-californian-restaurant-chez-panisse-2/#respond Fri, 29 Oct 2021 23:12:03 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/mother-of-american-cuisine-alice-waters-celebrates-the-50th-anniversary-of-californian-restaurant-chez-panisse-2/ BERKELEY, Calif .– Chez Panisse, restaurateur and culinary activist Alice Waters pioneered the farm-to-table movement and Californian cuisine. In fact, she is often referred to as “Mother of American Cuisine”. “It’s Chez Panisse’s 50th anniversary,” Waters said. “And so this is a time to take a break and think about what happened and what could […]]]>
BERKELEY, Calif .– Chez Panisse, restaurateur and culinary activist Alice Waters pioneered the farm-to-table movement and Californian cuisine. In fact, she is often referred to as “Mother of American Cuisine”.

“It’s Chez Panisse’s 50th anniversary,” Waters said. “And so this is a time to take a break and think about what happened and what could happen to Chez Panisse.”

Waters has been a champion of local sustainable agriculture for more than four decades. Before opening Chez Panisse, she attended UC Berkeley where she decided to study abroad in France.

“I experienced a lifestyle that woke me up,” Waters recalls. “Every day we went to a little restaurant and they had what was ripe, available at that time. I had never lived that way.”

During his trip, Waters also spent time shopping for local produce and preparing fresh, simple foods, an experience that would inspire the farm-to-table movement in America.

Chez Panisse incorporates fresh, local ingredients into every dish and also gives back to farms in a special way.

“Now it’s from the farm restaurant,” Waters said. “We take all the leftover food back to the farm, feed the soil with the compost.”

Waters is also giving back through food education, launching the Edible Schoolyard Project, which allows students to learn how to grow and prepare their own food.

“It’s my big initiative right now is to understand how we can cook in public schools, how we can buy food from local, regenerative and organic farmers… how we can feed the children,” said Waters said.

She added: “I know this is what we have to teach in school: the pleasure of the table, the consequences of the daily decisions we make about food.”

Visit here for more information on Chez Panisse.

To learn more about The Edible Schoolyard Project, go here.


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‘Mother of American Cuisine’ Alice Waters celebrates the 50th anniversary of Californian restaurant Chez Panisse https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/mother-of-american-cuisine-alice-waters-celebrates-the-50th-anniversary-of-californian-restaurant-chez-panisse/ https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/mother-of-american-cuisine-alice-waters-celebrates-the-50th-anniversary-of-californian-restaurant-chez-panisse/#respond Fri, 29 Oct 2021 23:07:49 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/mother-of-american-cuisine-alice-waters-celebrates-the-50th-anniversary-of-californian-restaurant-chez-panisse/ BERKELEY, Calif .– Chez Panisse, restaurateur and culinary activist, Alice Waters pioneered the farm-to-table movement and Californian cuisine. In fact, she is often referred to as “Mother of American Cuisine”. “It’s Chez Panisse’s 50th anniversary,” said Waters. “And so this is a time to take a break and think about what happened and what could […]]]>
BERKELEY, Calif .– Chez Panisse, restaurateur and culinary activist, Alice Waters pioneered the farm-to-table movement and Californian cuisine. In fact, she is often referred to as “Mother of American Cuisine”.

“It’s Chez Panisse’s 50th anniversary,” said Waters. “And so this is a time to take a break and think about what happened and what could happen to Chez Panisse.”

Waters has been a champion of local sustainable agriculture for more than four decades. Before opening Chez Panisse, she attended UC Berkeley where she decided to study abroad in France.

“I experienced a lifestyle that woke me up,” Waters recalls. “Every day we went to a little restaurant and they had what was ripe, available at that time. I had never lived that way.”

During his trip, Waters also spent time shopping for local produce and preparing fresh, simple foods, an experience that would inspire the farm-to-table movement in America.

Chez Panisse incorporates fresh, local ingredients into every dish and also gives back to the farms in a special way.

“Now it’s from the farm restaurant,” Waters said. “We take all the leftover food back to the farm, feed the soil with the compost.”

Waters is also giving back through food education, launching the Edible Schoolyard Project, which allows students to learn how to grow and prepare their own food.

“It’s my big initiative right now is to understand how we can cook in public schools, how we can buy food from local, regenerative and organic farmers … how we can feed the children,” said Waters said.

She added: “I know this is what we have to teach in school: the pleasure of the table, the consequences of the daily decisions we make about food.”

Visit here for more information on Chez Panisse.

To learn more about The Edible Schoolyard Project, go here.


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‘Mother of American Cuisine’ Alice Waters celebrates the 50th anniversary of Californian restaurant Chez Panisse https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/mother-of-american-cuisine-alice-waters-celebrates-the-50th-anniversary-of-californian-restaurant-chez-panisse-3/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/mother-of-american-cuisine-alice-waters-celebrates-the-50th-anniversary-of-californian-restaurant-chez-panisse-3/ BERKELEY, Calif .– Chez Panisse, restaurateur and culinary activist Alice Waters pioneered the farm-to-table movement and Californian cuisine. In fact, she is often referred to as “Mother of American Cuisine”. “It’s Chez Panisse’s 50th anniversary,” Waters said. “And so this is a time to take a break and think about what happened and what could […]]]>
BERKELEY, Calif .– Chez Panisse, restaurateur and culinary activist Alice Waters pioneered the farm-to-table movement and Californian cuisine. In fact, she is often referred to as “Mother of American Cuisine”.

“It’s Chez Panisse’s 50th anniversary,” Waters said. “And so this is a time to take a break and think about what happened and what could happen to Chez Panisse.”

Waters has been a champion of local sustainable agriculture for more than four decades. Before opening Chez Panisse, she attended UC Berkeley where she decided to study abroad in France.

“I experienced a way of life that woke me up,” recalls Waters. “Every day we went to a little restaurant and they had what was ripe, available at that time. I had never lived that way.”

During his trip, Waters also spent time shopping for local produce and preparing fresh, simple foods, an experience that would inspire the farm-to-table movement in America.

Chez Panisse incorporates fresh, local ingredients into every dish and also gives back to the farms in a special way.

“Now it’s farm restaurant,” Waters said. “We take all the leftover food back to the farm, feed the soil with the compost.”

Waters is also giving back through food education, launching the Edible Schoolyard Project, which allows students to learn how to grow and prepare their own food.

“This is my big initiative right now, is to understand how we can cook in public schools, how we can buy food from local, regenerative and organic farmers … how we can feed the children “said Waters.

She added: “I know this is what we have to teach in school: the pleasure of the table, the consequences of the daily decisions we make about food.”

Visit here for more information on Chez Panisse.

To learn more about The Edible Schoolyard Project, go here.


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Mayukh Sen celebrates immigrant women who revolutionized American food culture https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/mayukh-sen-celebrates-immigrant-women-who-revolutionized-american-food-culture/ https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/mayukh-sen-celebrates-immigrant-women-who-revolutionized-american-food-culture/#respond Thu, 21 Oct 2021 08:01:49 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/mayukh-sen-celebrates-immigrant-women-who-revolutionized-american-food-culture/ While readers will likely enjoy the stories of the seven women he describes in the book, including Mexico-born Elena Zelayeta, Italy-born Marcella Hazan, and Jamaica-born Norma Shirley, Sen suggests they should also be dismayed at how American society values ​​the experiences of some immigrants and devalues ​​those of others. Marcella Hazan. (Photo via Wikipedia) Immigrant […]]]>

While readers will likely enjoy the stories of the seven women he describes in the book, including Mexico-born Elena Zelayeta, Italy-born Marcella Hazan, and Jamaica-born Norma Shirley, Sen suggests they should also be dismayed at how American society values ​​the experiences of some immigrants and devalues ​​those of others.

Marcella Hazan. (Photo via Wikipedia)

Immigrant women, especially those of color, have been particularly marginalized and, as a result, Creators of taste is as much a cover project as a group biography. In her pages, which span from World War II to the present day, Sen unveils the story of immigrant women who have left a lasting mark on American food culture, whether or not they are credited for their contributions over the years. their life.

It details their entrepreneurial spirit, ethnic pride and dedication to culinary craftsmanship as well as the xenophobia, racism and misogyny that often limited the recognition they received. Some of these women achieved fame in their day, but not posthumously, while others, like Hazan, are revered today.

Even if Creators of taste attracting criticism from the American food establishment, the book also highlights how Sen’s subjects persevered in the face of oppressive social constructs. Najmieh Batmanglij, of Iranian descent, is a good example: she moved to the United States following the Iranian revolution and suffered fierce discrimination as a result; finding the food establishment unwilling to embrace her, she published her culinary writings on her own terms.

Describing himself as a ‘brown child of immigrants’ from India, Sen himself can understand the challenges endured by the women he chronicles in Creators of taste. “This is crucial why I chose to write this book and tell these stories,” he told Civil Eats. “I have sometimes been faced with questions like, ‘Why, as a man, are you writing these stories? What attracts you to these stories? Part of the answer is because I have a very complicated relationship with gender and also belong to many marginalized communities.

Sen’s immense empathy for his subjects prompts readers to reflect on the women, recognized and unrecognized, responsible for shaping the American palette. Civil Eats spoke with Sen about his motivation to write Creators of taste, his hopes for his influence on the food establishment and the progress made by marginalized people in the American culinary world.

In Creators of taste, you paint a portrait of seven immigrant women. How did you reduce it?

There are so many brilliant immigrant women throughout American history who have shaped food in various ways – teachers, cookbook authors, chefs, and more. What really helped me clear it up was asking myself, “What kind of a statement do I want to make with this book, especially in regards to assimilation, and if it is? the only path to success in America and under American capitalism? “

I have adapted my seven subjects with this guiding credo. I wanted to include a mix of more familiar names – Marcella Hazan, for example, is a widely revered figure – alongside lesser-known names, ones that haven’t been honored enough by the mainstream white culture, for lack of a better term. . I also wanted to make sure that readers who only have a passing interest in food had a reason to read the book, and in doing so, they could maybe get to know some characters they think they know, like Marcella, more thoroughly. , in a more complex way while also being introduced to a wide variety of other characters whose names they may not have heard before.

And what about the genesis of this book?

In 2017, I was a writer at Food52. I had written a lot of stories about people of color, women of color, immigrants of color, queer people of color – people who didn’t necessarily get the appreciation they deserve.

I had a friend named Shuja Haider, and he came up with this idea to me. He said, “I wonder if these essays can be some kind of immigrant history book. So I put it in my back pocket.

“I think the most drastic way to push back this kind of trope in the food media is to tell the stories of various immigrant figures throughout American history who have shaped food in the most granular way possible.”

Fast forward a year later, and I’m starting to see some disturbing food media stories, lots of stories and social media campaigns who basically say, “Immigrants do the job.” I was really troubled that these talking points were so prevalent in the food media because I knew they came from publications and people who probably identified themselves as liberals. Yet these talking points seemed so consumer-centric to me in a way that dehumanized immigrants but centered this white consumer from middle class to upper class.

When you say immigrants do the job, it’s like, “What’s the job, and who doesn’t want it?” Who is centered there? So my frustration led me to formulate the idea for this book. I was like, “Well, I think the most drastic way to push back that kind of trope in the food media is to tell the stories of various immigrant figures throughout American history who have shaped food in the way. as granular as possible. Make sure their stories are focused rather than the perspectives of those middle to upper class consumers. This is where it started.



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The American culinary writer whose palate has become French https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/the-american-culinary-writer-whose-palate-has-become-french/ https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/the-american-culinary-writer-whose-palate-has-become-french/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 01:07:32 +0000 https://werecookingrestaurantsusa.com/the-american-culinary-writer-whose-palate-has-become-french/ Alexandre Lobrano. Photo credit: @ Steven Rothfeld Alec Lobrano talks to Patrice Bertrand about his favorite chefs, his love of cooking and why French cuisine is the best in the world… and that’s just the beginning. “When I tell people that I have lived in France for over 30 years, many people ask me if […]]]>
Alexandre Lobrano. Photo credit: @ Steven Rothfeld

Alec Lobrano talks to Patrice Bertrand about his favorite chefs, his love of cooking and why French cuisine is the best in the world… and that’s just the beginning.

“When I tell people that I have lived in France for over 30 years, many people ask me if I consider myself French”, explains Alexander Lobrano, France today culinary writer, who, because of the Covid and the confinement in Paris, has temporarily retired with his French wife in the Gard department. There, they live in a small village between Nîmes and Uzès where they have restored a set of 17th century stone houses.

“The answer is no,” he continues. “My education and imagination were nurtured by the English language and the American values ​​of egalitarianism, politeness, skepticism of official authority and modesty. But a vital part of me has become French – my palace. I find the subtlety of a sauce such as a hollandaise or a béarnaise magnificent. I think this subtlety is very French. It gave me a much more sensitive and subtle palate than when I arrived in France years ago.

Alec, as he is called, describes this slow metamorphosis of his palate and taste buds in his latest book, My place at the table. A captivating memoir full of insights into French culinary culture, it tells how a shy teenager from suburban Connecticut, who discovered his passion for restaurants on his first trip to Europe in 1972, became one of the critics. Foodies and France’s most influential food writers.

“Now that the book is about to hit the world, I’m starting to think to myself, ‘Oh, my God, what have I done? ”, Says Alec. “It’s very personal and very tender. On the other hand, when you hide something, it creates shame. When you talk about something, it dulls its power when exposed. What Alec has brought to light is a detailed and intimate portrait of himself and a poignant account of his complicated rise: his arrival in Paris in 1986 to work for an American fashion magazine, his first food article. (on a famous cheese maker), his daily stringer fights, his experiences with French culinary culture and the French, his discovery of Paris and its restaurants, his loves, his failures, his successes, his ten years as a European correspondent for the ‘iconic, now disappeared Gourmet magazine…

A perfect sole meunière
A perfect sole meunière at the North Terminus in Paris © Alexander Lobrano

EACH RESTAURANT IS A THEATER

My place at the table concludes with his work for the French financial daily The echoes, for which, until the end of the 1990s, he wrote articles in French. At this point, Alec ceased to be the simple “American in Paris” he was when he arrived. He did it: he is recognized by the French themselves, they know he knows their cuisine and their culinary culture from the inside out and is able to judge it. This is also the feeling that any Frenchman who reads his book will probably have.

Asked about himself and his profession (he cautiously says “gastronomic writer” rather than “restaurant critic”), the warm and sociable Alexander Lobrano, 60 years old, robust, expresses himself with passion. “I love restaurants,” he says, “for the food, of course; but I like the conviviality, and I like the drama… I think that the restaurants are like theaters of novels where there is a representation. A meal in a restaurant is like a play. Some performance is better than others.

Alec points out that this love of conviviality comes from his childhood, spent in Westport, Connecticut, a chic and conservative suburb of New York, where his father was an executive in the textile industry. “I grew up in a family where the table was very important,” says Alec, who has not set foot in his native country for two years because of the pandemic. “Not just for the food, but because we sat down, we waited, we all had dinner together every night at the table and I couldn’t leave if I didn’t have a good excuse. At the table, my mother was like a sort of conductor: she felt that this is where you learn conversation. I have two siblings. We’ve all had a ride. She asked about something and we talked about it. You learn the conversation. Conversation is an art like cooking is an art.

According to INSEE, the French National Statistics Office, France has 175,000 restaurants, including 18,000 in Paris and its surroundings, a vast field of investigation for the hundred or so leading food critics who operate in France. When he is in the French capital, Alec admits that he dines at a restaurant four or five times a week – but not all the time: preferably in the evening and never on weekends because the places are too busy.

“I think the best day to go out in France is Thursday. The chefs have already made all the broths, the kitchen is well stocked, everything works well, they have everything to cook well and they cook for a local clientele, whether in Avignon, Paris, Strasbourg ”, specifies Alec, whose previous book , Want to Paris, reviews the 109 best restaurants in the capital.

Roast beef and mashed potatoes
Roast beef and mashed potatoes at A L’Epi d’Or, one of Parisian favorite bistros © Alexander Lobrano

THE INVISIBLE MAN

Like many of his colleagues, Alec prefers to eat out incognito, often with friends. For him, this is the best way to form the fairest opinion on the establishments and dishes that he will present later in his articles.

“I like to be invisible. I always want the people who read what I write to have a wonderful meal and a happy experience. The only way I can do this is to be completely anonymous so that I can be completely objective and have the same experience as anyone else.

This invisibility also allows him to appreciate another dimension of the restaurant: the reception of his staff. “Food, of course, is important, but so is hospitality because if you feel that people care and are happy that you are there, you relax and when you relax you start to have fun. . I think good hospitality is usually a sign of a well-run restaurant, ”says Alec.

This method has paid off and has given him a few favorite restaurants that he visits regularly. In Paris we are Septime, in the 11th arrondissement. “It’s hard to get a reservation,” he says. “But every time I go back there, I have to say that Bertrand Grébaut, the chef, keeps growing. Her imagination is so exquisite and her food is like edible poetry. It’s just great food. It’s so elegant, so exciting. I like to follow young chefs like that.

Fried pork belly
Fried pork belly with salsify at Volver in the Gard @Alexander Lobrano

If Alec likes to follow these young chefs, it is precisely because he is excited by the current creative energy in France. He does not share the common idea that French cuisine is overrated or in decline. “If we are talking about the Western world, I would say that France is the best country for gastronomy,” says Alec, who has accumulated his experience in countless restaurants, from the humblest bistros to the greatest tables. “The codes and cooking techniques have been codified and created in French kitchens and French culinary education is the best in the world. Thus, between the best products in the world, fabulous wines, an amazing culinary education and a general public passionate about food and who really knows it, the level of gastronomic culture in France is unique in Western countries.

He makes a good point on these “fabulous wines”. Indeed, French cuisine is inseparable from its wines and, in this regard, it is hard not to think of Curnonsky, perhaps the most famous of French gastronomic writers, who, more than 80 years ago, put them side by side in its immense compilation of French recipes, French cuisine and wines.

“My wine education took place entirely in France,” explains Alec. “I can’t imagine having a meal without wine and it doesn’t have to be expensive. What is wonderful in the south of France is being able to buy fine wines and they cost € 5 a bottle. Wine flatters food, food flatters wine. Wine pairing is a great art, so a good sommelier can add a lot to a meal. I find it interesting that more and more women are working as sommeliers. They do the job differently and are more eager to share what they know.

Lobrano's new kitchen
Alec’s new kitchen at home in the Gard © Alexander Lobrano

AT HOME IN THE KITCHEN

Unlike Curnonsky, who had neither a kitchen nor a dining room in his apartment, Alec is an avid cook. “During the first confinement, I was in Paris and everything stopped,” he recalls.

“It was quite shocking and strange not to go to a restaurant. So, I had to cook a lot. I like to cook because it changes my relationship with food. Instead of being the one sitting at a table I’m the one standing in the kitchen and that gives you respect for chefs and how hard this work is.

“Now that we have migrated south to our house in Gard department, we don’t go out often, although there are some wonderful restaurants there. Instead, we cook and cook. I find myself constantly looking for new tastes, recipes and inspirations in cooking, ”says Alec, who the very morning of our conversation had gone to the Uzès market.

Market in Uzès
Market in Uzès @ Alexander Lobrano

“He has a wonderful, wonderful market,” he says. “I bought everything that was beautiful – chicken, asparagus, new garlic (young garlic). But I don’t really know what I’m going to cook tonight. In the countryside, it’s the products that tell you what to cook so I don’t open cookbooks. I buy the best food and say, okay, I’ll roast the chicken and maybe we’ll have asparagus with it. Sorry, however, foodies: don’t expect Alec to succumb to the temptation to open his own restaurant.

“The idea occurred to me from time to time but, luckily, my sanity came back and I said to myself: ‘Are you crazy?’.

“Cooking for five or six people is one thing, but can you imagine cooking for 60 people? When I was in college, I worked in restaurants and beachfront hotels in New England. I know how difficult it is.

So what are his plans for the future? The answer is simple: write more books, keep working (“I’m busier than ever,” he says), travel, visit family in the US and… stay in France for good.

“I don’t think I’ll ever leave,” he told me. ” I could not. I have two houses. I have a country where I was born and I have a country that I have chosen. And I love them both dearly.

“I would never be able to return to America for good and say goodbye to France. I think I grew up here and the comfort and fun of everyday life here, life has meaning for me here. I am extremely happy. Another thing is also certain: Alec knows how to hold his place at the table.

From France Today magazine

Lobrano final cover
The cover image of My Place at the Table by Alexander Lobrano


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